20 min read

The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 28, 2020

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
11 min read

Longevity & Vitality - Part 5: The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 24, 2019

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
12 min read

Abundance Insider: January 18th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jan 18, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: One-minute healthcare clinics, bioprinted spinal cord repairs and how AI systems “think.”

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Abundance 360 is only a week away! Join Abundance Digital to view the full livestream of this event, where we appreciate the technological breakthroughs of this past year and draw attention to the technologies that will move from deceptive to disruptive in 2019. Full livestream schedule and speaker descriptions can be found here

A Neural Network Can Learn to Organize the World It Sees Into Concepts -- Just Like We Do

What it is: Researchers at the MIT-IBM Watson Lab are using General Adversarial Networks, or GANs, to help explain how artificial intelligence systems “think.” GANs are a form of AI that pits two neural networks against each other to achieve a larger goal, such as creating new pictures of dogs, human faces or swapping heads in photos. In a process akin to knockout genes in biology, the researchers trained their GANs on pictures, and then turned neurons on and off to discover what they represented. Strikingly, the GANs representation of features closely mirrors how humans represent concepts like trees or doors — and even the nuances between types of trees or doors and how they fit into particular images (e.g. clouds go in the sky, versus the grass). As an illustration, the team has created an app called GANpaint, which you can use to experiment.

Why it's important: As we grow increasingly reliant on AI systems to make decisions for us and automate our lives, it’s critical that we begin to understand how these algorithms work.  Look for this example to spur new lines of research, as well as feedback loops to make AI’s smarter and more effective.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Bio-Printers Are Churning Out Living Fixes To Broken Spines

What it is: In a groundbreaking study, researchers from the University of California at San Diego successfully bioprinted spinal implants to regenerate spinal cords in injured mice. Essentially, the team printed a 3D biomimetic hydrogel scaffolding, customized to a given rodent with spinal cord damage. They filled this scaffolding with neural progenitor cells (basically spinal cord stem cells), which facilitate axon (spinal cord cell) regeneration. After implanting the scaffold-neural cell matrix into the mice, the researchers observed axon regrowth around the implant. Eventually, the mice regained partial movement of their hind legs.

Why it's important: Bioengineers are using 3D printers and regenerative medicine to completely transform how we rehabilitate, cure and repair the human body. Current applications include replacing bones, augmenting dentistry, custom-fitting prosthetics, replacing organs and repairing nerves. While most bioprinting research is carried out in vitro (in Petri dishes), this experiment was performed in living mice, explicitly showcasing this technology’s ability to transform quality of life. As Peter is discussing in his Longevity and Vitality blog series, various regenerative medicine technologies are converging to dramatically extend the healthy human lifespan.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg

Researchers Discover A Method To Make 3D Printing 100 Times Faster Using Light

What it is: Researchers at the University of Michigan have developed a new 3D printing method that can produce complex shapes at up to 100 times the speed of traditional 3D printers. In conventional stereolithography, 2D images are projected onto liquid resin that hardens when exposed to light, but the stacking of these solid layers is far too slow a process for commercial-scale print runs. By using two different wavelengths of light, however, this printing method can now selectively harden specific parts of the printed resin while keeping resin near the projection window liquid. This allows for continuous printing (no incremental layering involved!) and massive speed improvements.

Why it's important: 3D printing has seen impressive adoption rates across manufacturing, but with slow printing speeds, it has yet to hit the big ranks. By selectively hardening photoreactive resin and thereby enabling a continuous print job, however, this method offers both a speed upgrade and major advances in structural integrity over filament 3D printing. Also capable of printing with a number of new resins, the technology has tremendous potential to commercialize high-speed and high-resolution additive manufacturing. Move aside, injection molds.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair

Face-Scanning A.I. Can Help Doctors Spot Unusual Genetic Disorders

What it is: DeepGestalt, an AI built by the Boston-based tech company FDNA, is extending the applications of facial expression to identify children with rare genetic disorders. In a recent study involving 17,000+ kids with over 200 disorders -- many of which have recognizable facial features -- the AI correctly distinguished between subtypes of disorders 64 percent of the time. In contrast, human clinicians have a roughly 20 percent success rate. To achieve this feat, FDNA first trained DeepGestalt to identify faces in general, and then applied transfer learning to identify deviations from normal to spot possible disorders.

Why it's important:  Already in use with FDNA’s Face2Gene platform, this AI will help clinicians accurately identify and treat disorders faster and less invasively. This AI also leverages transfer learning, one of the key breakthroughs from DeepMind that enabled it to learn to play new Atari games from scratch. Where else can this process be applied? Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin

Ping An Good Doctor Launches Commercial Operation of One-Minute-Clinics-In-China

What it is: Ping An Good Doctor, China’s largest online healthcare services provider, has now expanded its AI-geared “one-minute clinics” across eight major Chinese provinces and cities. With signed service contracts for almost 1,000 units and a growing user reach of over 3 million patients, the company has stocked its 24/7 compact booths with more than 100 categories of cryogenically refrigerated common drugs, purchasable through smart vending machines. Each clinic houses an ‘AI Doctor,’ trained to collect data on patient symptoms and medical history through voice and text input, after which one of Ping An’s human doctors provides remote diagnoses, medical advising, and immediate online prescriptions.

Why it's important: As the Chinese government drives forward a comprehensive “Healthy China” strategy, the nation’s online healthcare market continues to boom. Predicted to surpass US$14.4 billion in value by 2025, the domestic market has seen countless new players, with Ping An Good Doctor at the helm. Offering everything from online consultations for over 2,000 common diseases to one-hour drug delivery services, Ping An’s platform serves as a groundbreaking example of digitized and democratized healthcare: a glimpse of the future in which any patient can access transparent health information, expert advising and medical care anytime, anywhere. Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair

Tesla Proposes Microgrids With Solar And Batteries To Power Greek Islands

What it is: Tesla leadership recently met with the government of Greece as a preliminary step in deploying energy storage microgrids on the Greek islands. Similar to the systems that Tesla deployed in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Samoa, these systems would include photovoltaic solar arrays to capture energy, and energy storage battery banks. Tesla has had a presence in Greece for several years, and previously built an electric motor research and development center there.

Why it's important: This year, solar energy broke records all over Europe. Across the region -- and the world -- we’re seeing lower prices and larger solar farms than ever before. Tesla’s efforts to drive down the cost of photovoltaics and battery storage put the company at the forefront of the solar energy evolution.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider 3D Printing Data healthcare Tesla Batteries bio-printing solar solar energy biotech
14 min read

Abundance Insider: August 17th, 2018 Edition

By Peter H. Diamandis on Aug 17, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: Spider-inspired microbots, stem cell treatments for Crohn's disease, and open-source 3D bioprinters.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. If you enjoy Abundance Insider, consider joining Abundance Digital, Peter's online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. Within our community, you’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Spider-like Microbots Will Get Under Your Skin (In a Good Way)

What it is: A team of roboticists at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), and Boston University are developing a line of microscopic robots inspired by insects like the Australian Peacock spider. The intent is that these bots could one day be capable of performing delicate medical tasks inside the body, but first they needed to figure out how to build at the millimeter scale with micrometer-scale features. In a process they've called Morph, the team stacked 12 layers of elastic silicone to form the legs and abdomen followed by other more refined techniques like laser micro-etching to fine-tune the specs. At less than a centimeter wide, the spider bot is able to move, flex its joints and raise its abdomen all by injecting microfluids into a network of hollow channels running throughout its body.

Why it's important: Not only are we rapidly improving our ability to construct bots at microscopic scales, we're also witnessing an proliferation of biocompatible designs that promise to usher in more personalized and precise treatments, which in turn enable increased healthy lifespans. What other problems can we solve through biomimicry?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Morgan McDermott / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Stem Cell Transplants to Be Used in Treating Crohn's Disease

What it is: Queen Mary University of London and Barts Health NHS Trust have begun a clinical trial using stem cell transplants to grow new immune systems for patients with Crohn’s disease. A painful, chronic intestinal disease affecting 780,000 Americans, Crohn’s is intractably difficult to treat, often fought with inflammation-reducing drugs and even invasive surgical procedures to remove parts of the bowel. Shifting from a palliative approach, however, this clinical trial uses chemotherapy and hormone treatment to mobilize and harvest patients’ stem cells. Once additional chemotherapy wipes out a patient’s faulty immune system, reintroduced stem cells can then develop into new immune cells. Ultimately, researchers have evidence to believe that this newly populated immune system will no longer react adversely to a patient’s own gut or ward off drug compounds before they have a chance to work.

Why it's important: As Chief investigator James Lindsay explains, "We're hoping that by completely resetting the patient’s immune system through a stem cell transplant, we might be able to radically alter the course of the disease, [...] [allowing] some patients to finally respond to drugs which previously did not work.” Beyond Crohn’s disease, a recent application of stem cell transplants to wipe out and replace immune systems has even been found successful in treating multiple sclerosis. By targeting the immune system directly, stem cell transplants therefore show great potential for damaged tissue replacement and long-term clinical care of some of today’s most baffling chronic diseases.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Morgan McDermott / Written by Claire Adair 

HALO Collar Promises to Reduce Concussions in Contact Sport

What it is: Aexos, a canadian startup founded by two athletes, released HALO: a wearable compression shirt designed to combat concussions in contact sports. Specifically, HALO minimizes the risk of whiplash, which occurs when a sudden blow to the head makes it jerk forward or backward. The force of whiplash can tear muscles in the neck and cause concussions. HALO protects wearers in three ways: neck support, posture support, and reduction of head movement when impacted. Safe 4 Sports already officially endorsed the product, and preorders are now live through Kickstarter.

Why it's important: Sport-induced head trauma has profound effects on work and quality of life. Helmets are critical to prevent concussions, but they don't always work: impacts can propagate through even the best helmet technology, and brain trauma can occur as a result of rotational movements of the brain due to receive impact forces. HALO is another tool in the athlete's tool box to stay safe, healthy and exert sustainably.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

MIT Uses Cryptographic Ledger to Track Police Surveillance

What it is: MIT researchers have created a digital ledger to help track police surveillance and usage of data collected by private companies. Investigators frequently need to access online data from tech companies -- data which users might think is private and protected. When this data is accessed by law enforcement, certain information needs to stay secret so as to not compromise the investigation. At the same time, knowing what data was accessed by law enforcement allows the public to hold law enforcement and the legal system accountable. This blockchain application will add time and other event triggers to law enforcement data usage. After the relevant investigation(s) expire, information about the accessed data can immutably be published to the blockchain. The MIT team proposes leveraging a blockchain-based ledger and smart contracts to ensure transparency and accountability when it comes to law enforcement accessing our online data.

Why it's important: In 2018 data and privacy rights are a hot conversation topic. In a world powered by data-driven machine learning algorithms, is it reasonable to trade our privacy -- in the form of data about every aspects of our lives -- for hyper-efficient products and services? If we do not have privacy, it's important, at the very least, to have insight and transparency into how our data is used. The power of blockchain is its ability to immutably add transparency to the flow and history of information.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

CMU Engineers Find Innovative Way to Make a Low-Cost 3D Bioprinter

What it is: Researchers at Carnegie Mellon (CMU) are beginning to crack the code of large-scale, low-cost bioprinting while preserving the quality of a detailed print. Their printer? A standard MakerBot desktop 3D printer, modified over six years with open-source hardware and software, now capable of printing lab-grown cells, including collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins. A novel technique specifically designed to print soft and living materials, CMU’s Freeform Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels (FRESH) prints tissue in a gel, which is then carefully melted away to guarantee the viability of cells. CMU’s engineers have made their bioprinter designs open source -- now buildable for under $500 -- enabling new medical collaborations and democratized access.

Why it's important: One of the greatest challenges in bioprinting involves preserving the high resolution of small prints while still achieving tissue scaffolds at a larger scale. Building upon CMU’s large volume syringe pump extruder, however, researchers may soon be able to scale up the printing of biomaterials, such as cartilage and other complex artificial human tissue, without losing essential detail in cellular layers. Now plummeting in cost, bioprinting lab-grown cells to form living structures at scale cam revolutionize regenerative medicine, enabling us to cheaply support, repair, and augment diseased and damaged areas of the body without losing the resolution critical for functioning tissue.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Tech Mahindra Adopts Facial Recognition to Mark Attendance

What it is: Now that facial recognition technology is powerful and cheap enough to run on even a mobile device, Indian tech giant Tech Mahindra is bringing it into the workplace. Employees, after giving consent, can opt to enter facilities with their face versus keycards. Additionally, the Tech Mahindra system will also monitor employees' mood to better understand how day-to-day performance and morale.

Why it's important: As powerful technology like facial recognition democratizes and new use cases emerge, what regions of the world will be most receptive to adoption? Will India, for example, adopt facial recognition as favorably as their Chinese neighbors? How might this data help companies optimize their talent management processes?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

 

Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics AI blockchain bio-printing biotech Stem Cells Sports Technology
14 min read

Abundance Insider: July 13th, 2018 Edition

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jul 14, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: Kroger's autonomous delivery pilot, robot stunt doubles, and self-learning robots.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, AJ, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

Disney Imagineering Releases Autonomous Robot Stunt Doubles

What it is: For almost 60 years, Disneyland has used animatronic figures -- dynamic robots that bring beloved characters to life. But Disney’s newly launched (literally) Stuntronics are a whole new ball game. Initially built out of a small research project called Stickman, Disney Imagineering’s Stuntronics are fully autonomous, self-correcting aerial performers designed to fly across Disney parks, striking heroic poses and following perfect trajectories to stick the landing every time. Geared with on-board accelerometers and gyroscope arrays, these robotic 'stuntpeople' can be flung into the air like trapeze artists, controlling rotation and center of mass with remarkable precision.

Why it's important: As VR and immersive digital technologies increasingly bring you into on-screen action, lifelike autonomous robots are now bringing the action to you IRL. Whether dressed as Elastagirl or Iron Man, Disney’s lifelike Stuntronics robots are beginning to electrify real-world entertainment, performing near-superhuman stunts throughout entire theme parks and ushering in an era of safe interactive spaces . An extraordinary step towards human-like bipedal walking robots, Stuntronics represents a major breakthrough in robotic dynamism and maneuvering precision.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Kroger Supermarket Chain to Test Driverless Grocery Deliveries

What it is: Grocery giant Kroger and autonomous vehicle startup Nuro have announced a partnership to change the face of grocery shopping, making same-day delivery affordable and accessible for everyone. Customers will utilize Kroger’s “ClickList” ordering system and Nuro’s app to set up delivery via Nuro’s fleet of fully autonomous vehicles. The pilot market will be named soon, with deliveries expected to begin in the fall.

Why it's important: By partnering with startups, traditional "brick and mortar" businesses are adopting exponential technologies at an accelerating rate, and to everyone’s benefit. Here, Nuro gains access to a distribution network of 2,800+ stores in 35 states (presumably allowing the company to secure funding), while Kroger shows us that it can reinvent itself for the future to compete with the likes of Amazon and Instacart. How does change your go-to-market strategy?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

New Material Eliminates Need for Motors or Actuators in Future Robots, Other Devices

What it is: A new material (nickel hydroxide-oxyhydroxide) that can change shape and exert a force of over 3,000 times its own weight has been developed at the University of Hong Kong. The material can be stimulated to undergo its shape change by low-intensity incident light or electric current, as well as small changes in humidity and heat. Stimulation by light, heat and humidity can be carried out wirelessly -- making this material ideal for artificial microrobotic muscles. Since nickel is the bulk element of the material, the material is low-cost and easy to fabricate.

Why it's important: Soft robotics are essential for creating robots that can mimic human behavior and perform human tasks. Human muscle tissue is highly effective at allowing us to perform complex movements, like making a fist or throwing a ball. Materials that eliminate the need for dimensionally-restricted actuators by providing a new approach to moving components of mechanical systems are integral for moving forward soft robotics.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Inside the Effort to Print Lungs and Breathe Life Into Them With Stem Cells

What it is: United Therapeutics 3D-printed a replica of an upper human airway. The windpipe plus two bronchioles were printed out of collagen -- biology's cement-like structural material. Right now, using stereolithography techniques (basically using light to selectively cure a polymer that reacts to light), the printer can print details that are on the order of 20 micrometers. For context, functional lungs require detail of less than one micrometer. While collagen lungs are not useful for organ replacement, United Therapeutics is working to embed lab-grown lung cells into a matrix of the collagen lung structure. The company plans to one day be able to print lungs and other organs en masse, bypassing organ shortages and the need for organ donors.

Why it's important: United Therapeutics projects they'll be able to produce fully manufactured organs in 12 years -- a negligible timeframe relative to human history, where we’ve needed to rely on nature to create replacements for defective body parts. We are right around the corner from a transformative, revitalizing technology. 3D printing technology is rapidly evolving with detail becoming finer and finer every year. Likewise, stem cell culturing technology will certainly impact the ability to engineer and grow lung tissue cells to embed in this 3D printed cellulose structural matrix.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Kayak Launches Virtual Reality Exploration Tool

What it is: If we can sample food and try on clothing before a purchase, why not test-drive a city before committing to a flight? Enter Kayak VR, a virtual reality platform that lets you explore a city and learn about its most treasured landmarks from the comfort of your living room. Accessible through Google’s Daydream headset, Kayak VR is currently piloting two cities -- Venice and Kathmandu -- providing travel tips and trends, audio tours on landmarks, exploration of local hotels, and a sense of the real scale (and crowdedness) of a given destination. Perhaps one of Kayak VR’s more remarkable features is the app’s stereophonic sound option, adapting its audio tour to your visual focus within a given scene.

Why it's important: Targeted at the ‘pre-exploration’ of a city, Kayak VR serves both tourists on the fence about where to go and eager planners building out a trip agenda. Zooming out, tools like Kayak VR democratize and delocalize global tourism -- an industry that contributed nearly $8.3 trillion USD to the global economy in 2017. Offering visually coherent and educationally rich data on your surroundings, the platform may one day allow anyone a private tour of the Sistine Chapel or a view from Mt. Kilimanjaro. While nothing beats circling Venice in a gondola or reaching the peak of a hike, Kayak VR’s informational tours and visual immersion could one day offer unprecedented exposure to billions without a passport or the ready capital for a flight.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

AI-Powered Robot Mimics Any Action After Watching It Done Just Once

What it is: Scientists at UC Berkeley have developed a robot that can mimic an action purely by observing a person perform the task a single time, live or in video. By combining an imitation algorithm to allow it to pick up new skills with a meta-learning algorithm to incorporate prior tasks and movements, the robot is able to perform actions like pushing cups toward a target or pick up fruit and put it in a bowl.

Why it's important: Programming robots has typically been a highly technical and time-intensive coding process. Even where robots have learned by watching other robots, perfection has come only after thousands of repetitions. Could this be an interface moment, accelerating our ability to communicate and teach? And what other opportunities are unlocked when robots can utilize similar meta-learning programs to develop strategies for new situations?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider 3D Printing Robotics Materials Science AR/VR AI robots Autonomous Drones disney Kayak imagineering driverless kroger materials soft robotics bio-printing computer vision