20 min read

The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 28, 2020

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
11 min read

Longevity & Vitality - Part 5: The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 24, 2019

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
15 min read

Abundance Insider: March 22nd, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 22, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: NVIDIA's latest AI artist, Google's all-neural mobile speech recognizer, and a glimpse into Tokyo's tech for the 2020 Olympics.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Join Peter Diamandis in Dubai, the City of the Future, for the inaugural Abundance 360 Dubai Summit on March 26 - 27, 2019. Hosted by the Dubai Future Foundation and the Crown Prince of Dubai, this two-day experience offers exponential leaders an immersive look into how technology will transform every industry. Read more about the program and apply here to join.

 

Harvard Study Unlocks A Key To Regeneration

What it is: A Harvard research team has achieved a major step in understanding how animals like lizards, worms, and jellyfish regenerate body parts. A few noteworthy results have come out of their investigation into how three-banded panther worms regenerate their entire bodies. The researchers found a “master control gene” called early growth response (EGR), which triggers changes in a complex system of 18,000 other genes during the regeneration process. Without the EGR gene turned ‘on,’ none of the other processes can happen. Humans express the EGR gene, too, and researchers know exactly how to control it. But the human version of EGR does not have the same switching effect that causes regeneration. Along with the fact that only 2 percent of our genome actively generates proteins, this study shows that the result of a specific genome depends on not only the code of the genome, but how that code is connected together.

Why it's important: Since the first human genome was sequenced at the start of the millennium, geneticists and biologists have made exponential progress in understanding how our genetic code operates. As we increase our genetic understanding of how other species regenerate, we’ll gradually extrapolate what we find into human-facing products. From stem cells to bioprinting to genetic engineering, regenerative medicine will be transformative in the decades to come.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Todd Sheerin / Written by Max Goldberg 

Nvidia AI Turns Sketches Into Photorealistic Landscapes In Seconds

What it is: Earlier this week, NVIDIA revealed GauGAN, an early prototype of what TechCrunch hails the “MS Paint for the AI age.” Using a generative adversarial network (GAN) trained on 1 million Flickr images, GauGAN can create photorealistic images from just a few lines drawn by a user. As an example, a user could click on “tree,” draw a line, and GauGAN will create an image of a tree trunk. GauGAN can do the same for the sky, sea, rock, hills, wood, and other objects. NVIDIA built the software on its Tensor-based RDX Titan GPU platform to facilitate near-real-time results, but Bryan Catanzaro, VP of Applied Deep Learning Research, thought the platform could also run on standard CPUs with a slightly longer delay. While NVIDIA hasn’t announced plans for a commercial version, it will likely release a free trial version to facilitate public experimentation.

Why it's important: As we discuss here in Abundance Insider, systems like GauGAN are rapidly democratizing the skills and hardware needed to interface with powerful AI. While a challenge remains in ensuring that these systems are trained on the right data sets, we’re approaching a time when deploying powerful AI models will be as easy as launching a new blog or website. How will you begin to use this capability to drive experimentation within your business?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Ikea Is Making Furniture Better For People With Disabilities — With The Help Of 3-D Printers

What it is: Launching its new ThisAbles project, IKEA has joined forces with nonprofits Access Israel and Milbat to create a line of products that makes furniture accessible to populations with special needs and disabilities. Aiming to make mainstream furniture accessible to all, the joint enterprise has not only identified over 130 products already suited to accommodate users with a range of disabilities, but has designed numerous low-tech add-ons. Think: oversized lamp switches, accessible handles for shower curtains and drawers, or customized hooks and couch legs. Yet while these hacks are only displayed in Israeli IKEA stores, users can now download free blueprint models anywhere in the world to 3D-print add-ons independently and on-demand.

Why it's important: By pairing customized add-ons and 3D printing technology, we can transform almost any mainstream product into one that accommodates the unique needs of users with a range of disabilities. While retailers could design creative hacks in-house, publicly released 3D blueprints would democratize products for any customer, multiplying the range of everyday goods usable by people with disabilities. And just as customers can request tweaks to IKEA’s add-ons, firms might even crowdsource design ideas and feedback, honing product solutions for specific use cases and consumer needs.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Robot Assistants From Toyota And Panasonic Prep For The Tokyo Olympics

What it is: Against the backdrop of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, tech giants including Toyota and Panasonic are working with the organizing committee to showcase a variety of exponential technologies, namely robotics. Toyota will use around 16 autonomous Human Support Robots and 10 Delivery Service Robots to assist spectators with directions, grabbing objects from the floor, or in delivering food. Panasonic plans to showcase about 20 of its power assist exoskeletons to help visitors with luggage and similar lifting tasks. Robotics firm ZMP is hard at work to deploy an autonomous taxi fleet to ferry athletes and spectators around the city. Finally, on the renewables front, NTT has nearly completed an effort to create all of the athletes’ medals from recycled e-waste. Further pilot projects in solar roads and parking lots are underway to help Tokyo meet its goal of powering the Games entirely from renewable sources.

Why it's important: Often, the exponential technologies we need to create abundance are already here but not evenly distributed. Similar to how XPRIZE structures its incentive challenges, this public-private effort from Japan reminds us that sometimes the only thing we are missing is the right catalyst and compelling occasion to overcome initial hurdles.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Google AI Blog: An All-Neural On-Device Speech Recognizer

What it is: Google has just announced the roll-out of a novel breakthrough in speech recognition: its all-neural, on-device recognizer that will power speech input in Gboard. In a new feat for AI, the recognizer’s ML model is trained using RNN transducer (RNN-T). This technology works by continuously processing input samples (voice speech), and outputs symbols as you speak — in this case, characters of the alphabet. The real leap, however, has to do with the storage size required by Google's algorithms. While previous cloud-based speech processing took up 2GB of storage, Google has successfully shrunk its speech algorithm storage demands down to 80MB, rendering its recognizer small enough to fit on your smartphone, and work offline.

Why it's important: In the past, speech recognition programs would have to record inputs, send a request from your device to a remote server, and then wait for a response to translate your sentences into text. Aside from the delays that result from cloud-based processing, this meant that speech algorithms could only allow you to type with your voice while online. By decimating storage requirements, however, Google has now eliminated the burdens of network latency and unreliable service, as its RNN-T recognizer outputs words the second you utter them.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Aaron Levin / Written by Claire Adair 

Stanford Medicine Announces Results Of Unprecedented Apple Heart Study

What it is: Researchers at Stanford Medicine recently revealed the results of a U.S. study of over 400,000 people in all 50 states to evaluate the Apple Watch’s ability to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib). Conducted in partnership with Apple, the eight-month study is the largest of its kind to ever be performed. The results: 0.5 percent of patients received notifications that something might be wrong, and 84 percent of these patients were in AFib at the time of the notification.

Why it's important: As Peter discussed in his Longevity & Vitality blog series, sensor and data abundance are transforming healthcare and medicine. The Apple Watch is Apple’s foray into the world-changing trend of mobile-as-a-medical-service. This study affirms the impact of wearables. For the first time in human history, we can detect early warning signs far before medical issues become deadly; as we live longer, how will you use your added health span to create an exponential impact?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics AI Artificial Intellegence healthcare biotech voice assistants Genetics regenerative medicine voice
14 min read

Abundance Insider: February 22nd, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Feb 22, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: OpenAI’s latest text-generation project, Qualcomm’s continued 5G momentum, and drone augmented law enforcement. 

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

OpenAI Built A Text Generator So Good, They're Not Releasing It

What it is: OpenAI, the nonprofit artificial intelligence research firm backed by Elon Musk and other key tech-personalities, built a highly powerful AI text-generator. Coined GPT-2, OpenAI’s new AI systems showcases a broad set of capabilities, like completing passages from a short prompt written by a human, succinctly summarizing long-form, human-written passages, and answering comprehension and commonsense questions. To begin, GPT-2 had access to unstructured data from 8 million web pages, simply to predict the next word given all the previous words within some text.

Why it's important: From deepfakes to AI news anchors and high-fidelity text generation, AI systems gained major research momentum over the past 24 months, with OpenAI at the forefront of these developments. What becomes possible when we have AI systems, trained with data sets of our own writing, that can write in our voice? More yet, what unprecedented productivity do we gain when we can train AI systems to read and create with our unique lens?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

This Origami Screen Turns Your Windows Into Solar Panels

What it is: A green disruptor in intelligent design, Australian firm Prevalent is working on a prototype of origami-style blinds that both generate electricity and reflect light into residential interiors. Mimicking the geometry of a common louver, the firm’s Solgami design consists of custom origami units, each printed flat and coated with dye-sensitized solar cells and reflective ink. Once each unit is folded into its fixed geometric shape and connected to a panel, the front of the panels can rotate to reflect light at various times of day. Most importantly, however, the shape of each Solgami unit allows light to bounce off the interior of the solar cell-coated panel multiple times, maximizing light absorption, after which it is reflected directly into the room.

Why it's important: Today, even the most advanced solar cells tout an efficiency of nearly 25 percent, leaving a hefty chunk of light untapped for electricity generation. As populations grow increasingly urbanized across the globe, what if we could innovate on basic home staples (such as windows and blinds) to double as household utility providers? In the words of Prevalent’s director Ben Berwick, “We’re looking at repositioning the city as a place of production, not just a place of consumption.” By reflecting unabsorbed light into its own architecture, Prevalent's Solgami design could help achieve this goal, enabling people to participate in a global transition to renewable energy and grow more self-sufficient in the process.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Aryadeep S. Acharya / Written by Claire Adair 

CRISPR Gene Editing Makes Stem Cells ‘Invisible’ To Immune System

What it is: Researchers at UC San Francisco have successfully used CRISPR-Cas9 to engineer induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that evade immune system response. Aiming for “universal” iPSCs (effective in any patient), the scientists first used CRISPR to delete two genes involved in the function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins. Located on the surface of most cells, MHC proteins help the immune system differentiate between foreign and native cells, prompting or preventing attack by natural killer (NK) cells. The researchers additionally found that insertion of cell surface protein CD47 played a key role in further inhibiting response by immune cells. Leveraging this triple combo, UCSF’s team observed no rejection of engineered stem cells when transplanted into humanized mice.

Why it's important: Scientists have long sought to unlock the therapeutic promise of pluripotent stem cells, but the immune system has posed a major obstacle to effective stem cell therapies. Programmed to ward off alien cells and agents, the immune system often rejects stem cell transplants, rendering donor and recipient “histocompatibility mismatched.” For the first time, however, “engineered cells [can] be universally transplanted [and] survive in immunocompetent recipients without eliciting an immune response,” as lead author Tobias Deuse explains. Replacing an individualized approach, these triple-engineered iPSCs could benefit a much greater range of patients at decimated production costs, marking a major leap forward in stem cell therapy research and regenerative medicine.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Drones Are Changing The Way Police Respond To 911 Calls

What it is: Cape, a software startup enabling long-range drone operation and telepresence, has recently entered into “first responder” pilot projects with the San Diego Fire Department and the Chula Vista Police Department. By deploying drones to incidents faster and cheaper than a helicopter, the drones are scaling police efforts to incidents which might never get a helicopter, or avoid diverting resources to 911 calls where physical responses are unnecessary. Additionally, as seen last week in a domestic violence and high-speed vehicle incident, the drones are also recording video of the event, which is later offered up as evidence in trial.

Why it's important: Drones and automation are becoming mainstream in the public sector. While the immediate driver for adoption is cost savings, look for the FAA’s Integrated Pilot Program to reveal new use cases and foster broader public support for the use of drones in the public.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Delivering Shipment Zero, A Vision For Net Zero Carbon Shipments

What it is: Earlier this week, Amazon announced Shipment Zero, its vision to make all of its shipments carbon neutral, with a milestone of 50 percent of all shipments by 2030. This builds on other commitments the company has made to sustainability, including investments in the Closed Loop Fund and a goal to power 100 percent of its entire global infrastructure from renewable sources. This is more than lip service: it follows a two-year project modeling Amazon's existing carbon footprint, which will now be provided as a tool for business units to identify ways to get to carbon zero.

Why it's important: Look for Amazon’s boldness to amplify recent announcements from major companies in the retail, CPG, and plastics industries around the circular economy. Longer-term, imagine the potential for Amazon to either spin out or open-source its methodology to help other companies do the same.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Qualcomm Unveils Snapdragon X55, The World’s Fastest 5G Modem

What it is: Before the announcement of any devices using the Qualcomm first-generation 5G modem (the Snapdragon X50), Qualcomm announced its second-generation 5G device, the Snapdragon X55. While the first-generation X50 will already enable unprecedented 5 Gbps download speeds, the second generation X55 boasts blistering fast 7 Gbps download speeds. The freshly announced modem will likely be incorporated into smartphones announced by the end of 2019.

Why it's important: We are just starting the 5G communications revolution. Next week, at the Mobile World Congress 2019, leading smartphone companies will unveil the first wave of 5G mobile devices. We'll soon see these new devices converge with freshly deployed 5G global communication networks. What new value will entrepreneurs and companies create on the incoming 5G technology wave?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider AI Artificial Intellegence healthcare Drones 5G Amazon biotech regenerative medicine supply chain qualcomm
14 min read

Abundance Insider: February 15th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Feb 15, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Training AI with Pictionary, the world’s largest 3D printed rocket engine, and the U.S. government’s new AI initiative.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

An AI Is Playing Pictionary To Figure Out How The World Works

What it is: One of the primary barriers to developing sophisticated voice assistants and interactive AIs is the technology’s lack of common sense, rendering most AIs far too narrow to function in unstructured environments. However, researchers at the Allen Institute for AI (Ai2) have now created an online version of the game Pictionary in an effort to engineer generalized and sophisticated reasoning into AI programs. Named Iconary, the game pairs a human player with AllenAI (an AI bot), after which both take turns drawing and guessing given phrases. After using computer vision to convert human sketches into clip-art icons, AllenAI attempts to guess the phrase using a database of words, concepts and common relationships between the two.

Why it's important: The use of Pictionary to train AI systems could have a number of extraordinary implications. First, Iconary offers a terrific example of leveraging the crowd to train and teach AI, expanding its current selection of over 75,000 phrases. Iconary even plans to create a leaderboard for human players, further gamifying the platform and accelerating AllenAI’s progress. Beyond teaching an AI to understand complex concepts, the crowd could refine AI systems’ understanding of how everyday concepts relate to one another — a task far more sophisticated than simple pattern-matching. Perhaps most exciting, however, Iconary’s outcomes could help researchers observe and refine methods for human-machine collaboration, a critical goal for the century ahead.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

A Human iPSC-Derived 3D Platform Using Primary Brain Cancer Cells To Study Drug Development And Personalized Medicine

What it is: Building on the development of BrainSpheres — essentially mini-brains created from induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSC) — researchers from the Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins have used these 3D models of human tissue to test the efficacy of the anti-cancer drugs temozolomide (TMZ) and the more experimental treatment doxorubicin (DOX). By adding a few glioblastoma tumor cells to a developing mini-brain, the team was able to mass-produce BrainSpheres with a mix of tumor and healthy tissue. While this is in itself a breakthrough, the team also discovered that TMZ and DOX successfully reduced tumor size by roughly 30 percent and 80 percent, respectively, while also sparing healthy tissue.

Why it's important: Testing on animals is costly and time-intensive, and discoveries rarely translate from mice to humans; similarly, cultivating tumors from humans is of limited relevance since healthy tissue typically responds differently. As this team looks to reproduce the application of BrainSpheres to viral infections and neurodevelopment diseases, look for drug discovery and testing to accelerate in both speed and accuracy.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Physicists Uncover Quantum Structure Of Buckyballs

What it is: Analyzing real-world quantum phenomena is challenging because the quantum states of a given particle are easily disturbed by environmental magnetic fields, electric fields, thermal vibrations, and other disruptive stimuli. As the quantum system at hand grows in size, quantum phenomena become increasingly hard to detect. Standard lab-scale quantum experiments typically include only a handful of atoms. Now, JILA researchers (a partnership between NIST and the University of Colorado) achieved the most robust analysis of the largest quantum system analyzed extensively to date: buckyballs (soccer-ball like spheres of 60 carbon atoms). Buckyballs are a promising platform for building out these quantum systems, specifically because of their highly symmetric 60 carbon atoms.

Why it's important: We are in the midst of a quantum revolution. Deepening our understanding of quantum systems is fundamental to transitioning classical computation and communication to a robust network of quantum communication, information and computation. Already, quantum technology enables more accurate GPS technology, robust scientific instruments, a slew of detectors and more. With more precise control and understanding of quantum states, next-generation use cases will enable us to communicate more securely, compute faster, and control the world around us with higher resolution.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Peter H. Diamandis / Written by Max Goldberg 

 

UK Startup Shows Off World’s Largest 3D Printed Rocket Engine

What it is: U.K.-based startup Orbex just showed off what they believe is the world’s largest 3D printed rocket engine, standing at 56 feet (17 meters) tall -- roughly one-fourth the size of SpaceX’s Falcon 9. The engine is manufactured in a single piece without joints, creating a rocket that is up to 30 percent lighter and 20 percent more efficient than other small launchers and better able to withstand extreme temperature and pressure fluctuations. Set to launch in 2021, the feat is a collaborative effort: Orbex is working with engineers from NASA and the ESA, and partnered with the Swiss satellite startup Astrocast to launch 64 nanosatellites to build a global Internet of Things network.

Why it's important: The private space race continues to heat up. This news comes on the heels of Relativity Space’s signed U.S. Air Force contract to launch their own 3D-printed engine from Cape Canaveral. Look for these improvements to accelerate as competition intensifies and designs continue to digitize.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Smart Pills Filled With Tiny Needles Could Inject Medicine Directly Into Your Stomach

What it is: Published in Science just last week, this team of researchers just developed a new capsule device that may one day allow patients to orally ingest any number of drugs, notably including injected insulin. Inspired by the self-righting shape of the leopard tortoise, these smart pills — “self-orienting millimeter-scale applicators” (or SOMA) — can continuously attach to the gastric wall regardless of how they land. Containing tiny, spring-loaded needles, the SOMA then autonomously inject periodic payloads of medication into the top layers of a patient’s stomach tissue. In a preclinical trial evaluation involving insulin delivery, SOMA was even shown to provide equivalent drug exposure when compared to insulin injections under the skin.

Why it's important: Particularly in the case of diabetes, SOMA and similar needle-containing smart pills could transform drug delivery, eliminating the laborious daily injections required of over 415 million diabetic patients worldwide. As explained by MIT’s Robert Langer, “We are really hopeful that this new type of capsule could someday help diabetic patients and perhaps anyone who requires therapies that can now only be given by injection or infusion.” While still in the early proof-of-concept stages, such smart pills could give rise to everything from vaccines-in-a-pill to oral replacements for intravenous drips. Such a paradigm shift could prove monumental, enabling demonetized immunizations for _all_ children, low-cost emergency treatments and automated self-care on unprecedented scales.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

President Trump’s Plan To Keep America First In AI

What it is: After first inventing artificial intelligence, the U.S. continues to lead in artificial intelligence technology. Yet, through the past decade of exponential AI growth, the U.S. government has lacked a high-level strategy to for investing in and preparing for AI. In recent years, a dozen countries, including China, have announced their plans for accelerating AI research, development and adoption. This week, President Trump signed an executive order directing federal agencies to support AI research and commercialization. The action directs government agencies to focus on opening government agency data to better train AI systems, on prioritizing research and development, and on future workforce development.

Why it's important: From the military to infrastructure to healthcare, AI plays a massive role in modern society. Last year, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis wrote to the President expressing that the U.S. was not on pace to keep up with the ambitious AI plans of other countries, primarily China. Beyond the military and defense implications of AI, we are currently seeing a debate on how to thoughtfully regulate powerful AI applications like facial recognition. With the U.S. government’s existing plans to accelerate innovation in other vital Industry 4.0 areas like quantum computing, 5G communications and space, what technologies will next see support from the federal government?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space 3D Printing AI Artificial Intellegence healthcare biotech quantum computing regenerative medicine diabetes quantum mechanics
13 min read

Abundance Insider: February 8th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Feb 8, 2019

 In this week's Abundance Insider: Climbing robotic plants, a diabetes breakthrough, and a bigger-than Woodstock virtual concert in Fortnite.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Watch A Super-Fast 3D Printer Scientists Call The “Replicator”

What it is: Using synthetic liquid resin and CT-like scanning technologies, scientists at the University of California, Berkeley have developed a 3D printer that can produce replicas of nearly any scanned object in record time. Nicknamed “the Replicator” a la Star Trek, the printer draws largely upon CT scan-like technology, reverse engineering multiple 2D images of a 3D model at various angles. This sequence of computed images is then projected onto a rotating cylinder of liquid resin that selectively solidifies when exposed to given thresholds of patterned light.

Why it's important: By printing complex objects from photosensitive resin in one go — as opposed to mounting material layer by layer — this system enables researchers to produce smooth and flexible components at unprecedented rates. Beyond seamlessly high-resolution prints, however, these figures can even encase other objects embedded in the resin, allowing for the fabrication of multi-material components. Perhaps most exciting is the combination of the UC Berkeley team’s method with computed scans of 3D targets. Such a system could have dramatic implications in healthcare, for instance, offering rapid-fire prints of bespoke medical pieces, anatomical replicas and other multi-material devices.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

The World’s Fastest Supercomputer Breaks An AI Record

What it is: Summit, the supercomputer built by Oak Ridge National Labs, recently became the fastest supercomputer to run the TensorFlow AI system. The supercomputer, about the size of two tennis courts, leveraged its 27,000 GPUs to run at speeds exceeding an exaflop (a billion billion operations per second). Its mission is to tackle climate change by predicting weather patterns and events up to 100 years in advance.

Why it's important: While we’ve been successful in doubling computing power every 3.4 months, on average, we’ve never applied TensorFlow and GPUs to a supercomputer’s specialized high-speed connections. This development will inform other large-scale efforts elsewhere, and is an excellent application of machine learning to address problems considered unsolvable.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Jason Goodwin 

The First Tendril-Like Soft Robot Able To Climb

What it is: In an excellent example of biomimicry, italian researchers replicated the unique hydraulic actuation system that climbing plants like vines use to grow and climb. Essentially, plants deploy different concentrations of the molecule cytosol to cause water to flow to a desired location in the plant’s structure (osmosis). As the water flows, the plant’s structure changes shape. The researchers replicated this phenomenon in their lab-made “tendrils" by using plastic tubing, a 1.3V battery, and a solution of small ions. Applying a voltage caused the ions in the solution to behave like cytosol and enabled the plants to curl and grow. While roboticists have implemented osmotic actuation before, this development marks the first time that the soft robot can reset after its curl and climb.

Why it's important: The rapidly approaching trillion-sensor economy will transform our understanding of our bodies and the world around us. Similarly, the trillion actuator economy enabled by soft robotics will give unprecedented control of our environment. Imagine the ability to instantly change not only the layout of your apartment, but the millimeter-scale details of your couch design, kitchen table, or standing desk. What new possibilities emerge when technology can interact with the physical world?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

Amazing Self-Healing Coating Erases Scratches and Cracks in Seconds

What it is: Materials scientists from Northwestern University recently developed an oil-based coating for metals that self-repairs small chips and scratches within seconds. Almost everything that we build has a coating to protect the core structural material from environmental damage. Metals in particular are highly susceptible to corrosion (for example, rusting steel), and once chipped, scratched, or scrapped, the metal directly underneath the damaged coating weakens. In a robust demonstration, the researchers scratched the same spot 200 times in a row, each time showing that the coating returned to its undamaged state within seconds.

Why it's important: Some of the most catastrophic engineering disasters in history have resulted from coating damage, which means materials engineers and entrepreneurs are constantly presented with billion-dollar opportunities specifically related to coating. What age-old engineering problems can we solve with the power of modern materials science?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Functional Insulin-Producing Cells Grown In Lab

What it is: In a new feat for type 1 (T1) diabetes research, scientists at UC San Francisco have generated fully mature insulin-producing cells in the lab from human stem cells. Given T1 diabetes’ destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, researchers have long attempted (in vain) to produce lab-grown versions of these cells. However, only now has a critical facet of beta cell maturation been discovered: a process by which cells separate from the pancreas to form islets. By replicating this process artificially, UCSF’s team found that the cells’ development suddenly accelerated. Most importantly, however, once transplanted into healthy mice, these lab-grown “islets” yielded fully functional cells that produced insulin in response to blood sugar.

Why it's important: Up until now, T1 diabetic patients have been limited to treating symptoms through frequent insulin injections or otherwise face the risk of invasive pancreas transplants. Even in the latter case, however, only about 1,000 out of 1.5 million patients in the U.S. are able to get such transplants in a given year, many of which are unsuccessful. Generating, let alone transplanting, fully mature lab-grown beta cells has long been an elusive dream in regenerative medicine, one that could finally offer a cure to this autoimmune disorder. Now capable of bringing these cells to maturation, UCSF’s scientists are charging forward with new research to ensure safe transplantation into diabetic patients, thereby ensuring healthy insulin production for life.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Live Concert Inside “Fortnite” Drew More Viewers Than Woodstock

What it is: Fortnite Dance Fortnite, the world’s most popular massively multiplayer online game (MMOG), recently launched a shared experience centered on a 10-minute mini-set from electronic artist DJ Marshmello. Leveraging lessons from past gamewide events like its rocket launch, Epic Games teased the show with virtual posters, and even displayed visuals of the stage construction. An estimated 10 million concurrent users viewed the concert, with players emoting and dancing throughout. Epic monetized the event with in-game purchases of special skins and other virtual items.

Why it's important: This digital concert is a massive validation of what’s possible in the metaverse even without VR. Millions of users from around the globe participated in an entirely virtual live experience. What opportunities do you see to bring your community together in similar ways?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider 3D Printing Robotics Materials Science healthcare soft robotics nano technology biotech Stem Cells regenerative medicine diabetes fortnite
14 min read

Abundance Insider: January 25th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jan 25, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Lab-grown blood vessels, augmenting human-robot teamwork, and the latest microrobot breakthrough.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Abundance 360 is only two days away! Join Abundance Digital to view the full livestream of this event, where we appreciate the technological breakthroughs of this past year and draw attention to the technologies that will move from deceptive to disruptive in 2019. Full livestream schedule and speaker descriptions can be found here.

Molecular Machinery That Makes Potent Antibiotic Revealed After Decades Of Research

What it is: Antibiotic resistance is a global health crisis, and researchers have been looking for new molecules and approaches for some time. One avenue has been the pursuit of natural antibiotics, like McbBCD, which have evolved over eons. McbBCD produces an enzyme called microcin B17, which scientists have known to kill E.coli for over 30 years, but up until now, the mechanism by which microcin B17 operates wasn't known. Now, thanks to advances in genomics and protein purification, a multinational team out of Rutgers, Russia, Poland and England have uncovered the molecular machinery involved, which bodes well for the rational design of new antibiotics, antimicrobials and potentially anticancer drugs.

Why it's important: Here’s another example of the transformative power due to convergence in exponential advances across typically siloed disciplines. This breakthrough demonstrates the rapid digitization of biology, chemistry, and computing to unlock new understanding, which in turn enables new tools for solving the world's grand challenges.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Tiny Microbots Fold Like Origami To Travel Through The Human Body

What it is: Researchers from the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETH Zurich) demonstrated artificial microrobots that can swim and navigate through different fluids, independent of additional sensors, electronics or power transmission. Modeled on swimming microorganisms, the microrobots are made of a hydrogel nanocomposite, containing magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles allow researchers to guide the microrobots with an applied magnetic field, a common technique for facilitating targeted drug delivery. What’s unique about these microbots is that they dynamically change their shape in response to changes in their surrounding fluid. This unique locomotive capability will eventually be tuned to enable them to squeeze through tight blood vessels and other hard-to-navigate features in physiological systems, bringing us one step closer to ubiquitous nanobots monitoring every aspect of our physiology.

Why it's important: Materials science and biomimicry are leading the charge on many fronts of next-generation technologies, enabling future breakthroughs like ubiquitous nanobots. Such nanobots will transform how we think about healthcare, enabling real-time treatment and disease detection, as well as total optimization of our biology. As the saying goes, you can’t fix what you can’t measure, and we are well on the path towards achieving comprehensive measurement of our bodies. In the decades to come, what will these nanobots teach us about the human body?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

UVM Study: Wearable Sensor Could Detect Hidden Anxiety, Depression In Young Children

What it is: Researchers have now developed a tool to screen young children for internalizing disorders, characterized by internalizing one’s problems. Using a common “mood induction task” to elicit anxiety from children by presenting a potential threat (e.g. a hidden fake snake), the research team replaced human observation with wearable motion sensors. After processing the sensor data, a machine learning algorithm then analyzed children’s movements and found quantifiable differences between those with anxiety or depression and those without. By identifying physical signs of anticipatory anxiety, the algorithm could identify children with internalizing disorders in just 20 seconds with 81 percent accuracy, outperforming even parental assessments.

Why it's important: Bringing algorithmic diagnosis to bear on the more intangible realm of mental health could offer tremendous benefits in the way of early treatment. Sometimes showing symptoms as young as preschool, up to one in five children suffers from either anxiety or depression. These conditions are highly treatable at a young age, yet much more difficult to detect by caretakers. Given their propensity to result in serious risks such as substance abuse or suicide in adulthood, internalizing disorders are critical to treat early. With increasingly refined detection algorithms, screening children at scale and low cost may have a dramatic impact on mental health prevalence in both child and adult populations down the line.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

We Can Now Grow Perfect Human Blood Vessels In A Lab

What it is: For the first time, UBC researchers have successfully cultivated human blood vessels as “organoids” from stem cells in the lab. Organoids are three-dimensional, lab-grown cellular systems that mimic the characteristics of real human organs or tissues, in this case developing into functional human blood vessels when transplanted into mice. A perfect testing ground for vascular diseases such as diabetes, the vascular organoids were then induced into a “diabetic” state, exhibiting characteristically abnormal thickening of the basement membrane. This allowed researchers to identify a key inhibitor of enzyme γ-secretase that could prevent detrimental changes to blood vessels — a key cause of morbidity among diabetic patients.

Why it's important: While lab-grown blood vessel organoids have already provided a remarkable lead in the pursuit of diabetes treatments, this stem cell-based technology could have much farther-reaching implications. As explained by the study’s senior author Josef Penninger, “Every single organ in our body is linked with the circulatory system. This could potentially allow researchers to unravel the causes and treatments for a variety of vascular diseases, from Alzheimer’s disease, cardiovascular diseases, wound healing problems, stroke, cancer and, of course, diabetes.”  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

This New Nanomaterial From Researchers In India Might Give Forensic Fingerprint Detecting A Boost.

What it is: Indian scientists from the Nanoscience Laboratory and National Institute of Technology (NIT) Durgapur have developed a nanomaterial that could make forensic science simultaneously faster and more accurate. Fingerprint detection can be difficult because current materials often miss nuances in patterns, such as when fingers are damaged. By doping manganese and copper atoms on a zinc sulphide nanosystem — essentially replacing zinc atoms with copper and manganese — the team created particles more than a million times smaller than a millimeter and highly luminescent. Under UV light, latent prints up to 2 months old and on a variety of surfaces can be captured via a smartphone camera for real-time analysis and sharing.

Why it's important: We often think of nanotechnology in the context of new materials built into products, but materials science applications of nanotech are expanding exponentially. As one use case develops and is shared, new ideas form, such as this team's use of the material to develop new white LEDs. What opportunities might materials science and nanotechnology open up for you?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Aryadeep S. Acharya / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Amazon Built An Electronic Vest To Improve Worker/Robot Interactions

What it is: Amazon is at the forefront of robot-human worker interaction safety, and its latest innovation is a connected sensor-laden vest that allows robot workers to detect the location of human workers in an Amazon warehouse. Previously, Amazon warehouse associates proactively planned and marked which zones they would enter to perform maintenance or routine human logistics tasks. Now, workers can freely move around, while their vests passively update their robotic counterparts on their whereabouts.

Why it's important: We're seeing an unprecedented rise in robot-human collaboration all across the manufacturing and supply chain industries. Robots are often large, heavy, mobile and dangerous pieces of machinery. Just months ago, an incident involving Amazon warehouse workers, a robot, and bear repellent made international headlines. This IoT-enabled vest demonstrates that by leveraging converging exponential technologies (robotics, artificial intelligence, networks, sensors), companies can mitigate some of the risks of adopting a particular technology.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics Materials Science healthcare nano technology biotech Stem Cells nanobots regenerative medicine