12 min read

the next data-driven Healthtech Revolution

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jul 5, 2020

Increasing your healthspan (i.e. making 100 years old the new 60) will depend to a large degree on artificial intelligence.

Topics: Abundance Data Sensors AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare mobile health preventive medicine digital devices aging mHealth
20 min read

The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 28, 2020

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
8 min read

Longevity & Vitality - A Renaissance of Drugs and Genomics

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 21, 2020

The causes of aging are extremely complex and unclear.

Topics: Abundance AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare preventive medicine Stem Cells protein-folding aging
6 min read

why we age....

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 14, 2020

Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare.

Topics: Abundance AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare preventive medicine Stem Cells protein-folding aging
9 min read

Abundance Insider: November 1st, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Nov 1, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: AR-aided surgeries, remote human brain-to-brain collaboration, and a new flu-targeting antibody.

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and home in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, includes 100+ hours of coursework and video archives for entrepreneurs like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

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MediView XR raises $4.5 million to give surgeons X-ray vision with AR.

What it is: MediView XR recently raised US$4.5 million to further develop its Extended Reality Surgical Navigation system. Accessed through the Microsoft Hololens, MediView’s product grants surgeons a form of “x-ray vision” when conducting cancer ablations and biopsies. The system generates a personalized 3D holographic model for each patient based on CT and MRI scans. Next, ultrasound imaging updates the holographic display throughout the procedure. This process not only mitigates harmful x-ray radiation used in standard procedures today, but also improves visual acuity by translating 2D data into three dimensions. Surgeons can even rotate around the body while AR-overlaid visuals remain accurately mapped to the patient. Meanwhile, hand-tracking and voice commands allow surgeons to access any needed information on the spot. In its first set of human trials, MediView has already used its system on five live tumor patients and began a nine-patient trial in August. Leveraging its newly acquired capital, the company further aims to achieve FDA approval by 2021.

Why it’s important: Surgeons around the world are forced to make sense of 2D images for 3D applications. MediView’s technology would eliminate this hurdle and reduce surgeon error in doing so. Personalized 3D visualizations could also be used to educate patients on their conditions in a more intuitive manner. The educational applications of AR extend to medical schools as well, where mapping real data into practice procedures could boost student engagement and learning. The success of tumor removal surgeries is largely dependent on how precisely surgeons can incise the tumor, ensuring no cancerous traces are left behind. As AR headsets grow increasingly sophisticated, precise 3D models (coupled with biomarkers injected in the bloodstream to mark tumor cells) could vastly improve patient outcomes. MediView’s CEO John Black, who has performed over 2,000 surgeries himself, aims to transform the way surgeons interact with real-time data visualizations.

Engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air: The process could work on the gas at any concentrations, from power plant emissions to open air.

What it is: Scientists from MIT have developed a new method of extracting carbon dioxide from streams of air or feed gas, even at the far lower concentration levels found in the general atmosphere. The technology essentially works like a large battery: charging when CO2-laden gas passes over its polyanthraquinone-coated electrodes, and discharged when it releases a pure stream of carbon dioxide. Unlike some alternatives, the method requires no large pressure differences or chemical processes and can even supply its own power, courtesy of the discharge effect.

Why it’s important: Most carbon capture technologies require high concentrations of CO2 to work, or considerable energy inputs, such as high pressure differences or heat to run chemical processes. This device works at room temperature and regular pressure. Furthermore, it can generate both electricity and pure CO2 streams, valuable for a range of agricultural use cases, carbonation in beverages, and various other applications. Of course, the real benefit of scaling such a method involves our battle against climate change, where our ability to scrub the air of carbon dioxide could be a critical step in reversing environmental catastrophe.

Scientists Demonstrate Direct Brain-to-Brain Communication in Humans.

What it is: For the first time, humans have achieved direct brain-to-brain communication through non-invasive electroencephalographs (EEGs). In a newly published study, three subjects were tasked with orienting a block correctly in a video game. Two subjects in separate rooms were designated as “senders” and could see the block, while the third “receiver” relied solely on sender signals to correctly position the block. EEG signals from the sender brains were converted into magnetic pulses delivered to the receiver via a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device. If the senders wanted to instruct rotation, for instance, they focused on a high-frequency light flashing, which the receiver would see as a flash of light in her visual field. To stop rotation, senders would focus on a low-frequency light, which the receiver would then interpret as light absence in the set time interval. Using this binary stop/go code, the five groups tested in this “BrainNet” system achieved over 80 percent accuracy in aligning the block.

Why it’s important: A leader in the brain-to-brain communication field, Miguel Nicolelis has previously conducted studies that linked rat brains through implanted electrodes, effectively creating an “organic computer.” The rat brains synchronized electrical activity to the same extent of a single brain, and the super-brain routinely outperformed individual rats in distinguishing two electrical patterns. Building on this research, the leaders of the “BrainNet” human study claim that their non-invasive device could connect a limitless number of individuals. As brain-to-brain signaling grows increasingly complex, human collaboration will reach extraordinary levels, allowing us to uncover novel ideas and thought processes. Rather than building “neural networks” in software, operations like BrainNet are truly linking networks of neurons, creating massive amounts of biological processing power. We are fast approaching the prediction of Nobel Prize-winning physicist Murry Gell-Man, who envisioned “thoughts and feelings would be completely shared with none of the selectivity or deception that language permits.”

By targeting flu-enabling protein, antibody may protect against wide-ranging strains: The findings could lead to a universal flu vaccine and more effective emergency treatments.

What it is: Scientists recently discovered a new antibody that could tremendously catalyze pursuit of a universal flu vaccine. Experimenting on mice, the research team identified an antibody that binds to the protein nueraminidase, an enzyme essential for the influenza virus’ replication inside the body. While today’s most widely used flu drug, Tamiflu, inactivates neuraminidase, various forms of the latter exist, rendering Tamiflu and similar drugs ineffective for numerous different flu strains. Testing the versatility of their newly discovered antibody, however, the scientists administered lethal doses of different flu strains to a dozen mice, only to find that the new antibody protected all twelve from succumbing to infection.

Why it’s important: Now particularly salient, fighting the flu every season has been an ongoing arms race between humanity and the virus. As strains mutate and develop resistance to our existing medications, the need for alternative strategies has become far more pressing. This new research could accelerate our progress towards finally engineering a cure-all method for preventing and protecting against the flu, saving thousands of lives every year.

Elephants Under Attack Have An Unlikely Ally: Artificial Intelligence.

What it is: Researchers at Cornell University and elsewhere have recently started applying AI algorithms to track and save African Forest Elephants. As Forest Elephants have proven difficult to track visually, Cornell researcher Peter Wrege decided to set up microphones and listen for signs of elephant communication amidst rainforest trees. First, Wrege and his team at the Elephant Listening Project divided the rainforest into 25km2 grids. By then placing audio recorders in every grid square about 23 to 30 feet into the treetops, the team has thus collected hundreds of thousands of hours of jungle sounds—more than any human could possibly tag and make sense of. By then transforming these audio files into spectrograms (visual representations of audio files), the researchers could apply a neural network to the data and isolate sounds from individual elephants. In practice, these algorithmic outcomes are now helping park rangers achieve an accurate census of the population, track elephant movement through the park over time, and even proactively prevent poaching activity in the bush.

Why it’s important: AI has now been heavily applied to narrow (and growing) use cases across medicine, financial projecting, logistics, industrial design, navigation, and almost any mechanical or logic-based system you can think of. Yet today, it increasingly stands to help us understand unstructured environments and even animal-to-animal communication. Thanks to a convergence of computing power, sensors, and connectivity, methods such as that used by the Elephant Listening Project are now granting us a better understanding of extraordinarily complex natural ecosystems and species, and could aid in our pursuit to protect them.

First Look: Uber Unveils New Design For Uber Eats Delivery Drone.

What it is: Uber Eats and Uber Elevate will soon be delivering dinner for two via drone starting next summer in San Diego. Unveiled at last week’s Forbes Under 30 Summit in Detroit, the delivery drone design features six rotors, rotating wings, and can carry a meal for two in its body. While the drone’s ideal trip time remains relatively short at eight minutes (including loading and unloading), the drone is capable of up to an 18-mile trip, divided into three six-mile legs (from launch to restaurant, to customer, and back to launch area). The current plan involves flying from restaurants to a staging location, at which an Uber driver would then travel the last mile for hand-off to the consumer. Yet with an eye to the future of automated last-mile delivery, Uber is also considering landing drones on the roofs of delivery cars.

Why it’s important: Less than a year away from Uber Eats’ expected launch in San Diego airspace, we will soon begin to witness the commercialization of autonomous drones in everything from last-mile delivery to humanitarian aid. Not only are these trends slated to displace a significant percentage of cargo-related transit but will fundamentally alter our urban networks and the way tomorrow’s businesses deliver personalized services.

Want more conversations like this?

Abundance 360 is a curated global community of 360 entrepreneurs, executives, and investors committed to understanding and leveraging exponential technologies to transform their businesses. A 3-day mastermind at the start of each year gives members information, insights and implementation tools to learn what technologies are going from deceptive to disruptive and are converging to create new business opportunities. To learn more and apply, visit A360.com

Abundance Digital, a Singularity University program, is an online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated news feed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

(*Both Abundance 360 and Abundance Digital are Singularity University programs.)

Topics: Abundance Insider AR/VR AI health surgery bci elephants
13 min read

Abundance Insider: June 1st, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jun 1, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Self-driving USPS trucks, CRISPR in space, and multilingual robot writers.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Robotics Transportation health Artificial Intellegence robots autonomous vehicles self-driving cars biotech
14 min read

Abundance Insider: May 24th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on May 25, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Tiny robotic bees, lung cancer-detecting AIs, and a new synthetic biology milestone.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Penny-Sized Robotic Bee Is The Most Sci-Fi Thing You'll See All Week

What it is: Harvard’s RoboBee — one of the smallest flying robots ever built — has just gotten a major upgrade. Thanks to the engineering exploits of a research team at the University of Southern California (USC), a new and improved Bee Plus now weighs in at just 95 milligrams and barely straddles the diameter of a penny. Its biggest achievement, however, involves the bee’s actuators and doubled wing count. Using an actuator design called a unimorph, the USC team was able to successfully halve the weight of those actuators used in the Harvard RoboBee precursor. This in turn allowed them to install four (as opposed to two) wings, each with a span of 33 millimeters. Rendering much smoother flight, its wings now allow Bee Plus to perch, land, swim, pursue a path, and even avoid obstacles.

Why it's important: While Bee Plus and similar robo-insect prototypes are still restricted by a power-supplying tether, as on-board energy storage remains a significant engineering obstacle, USC’s team has already begun to tackle it. Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the team is now working on an approach that involves catalytic artificial muscles. Long-term, future descendants of the Bee Plus might one day artificially pollinate flowers, conduct search and rescue missions, or even monitor climate conditions in huge swarms. Farther afield, Professor Perez-Arancibia even imagines a future in which “our robots [fly] on Mars and Titan,” becoming “ant-inspired colonies of explorers.” What eventualities can you envision once these air-faring bots spread their wings?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Google’s Lung Cancer Detection AI Outperforms 6 Human Radiologists

What it is: In partnership with Northwestern Medicine, Google researchers created an AI system that detects lung cancer from CT scans better than well-trained humans. Engineers trained the deep learning model using 42,000 CT scans from 15,000 patients taken during a 2002 NIH study. Compared to six expert radiologists, when analyzing these CT scans, the deep learning model proved to detect cancer 5 percent more often, with an 11 percent reduction in false positives.

Why it's important: While the human eye is limited to the visible spectra and feature sizes on images, AI systems can take a pixel-by-pixel approach to data analysis. Also note Google’s deployment of old NIH data: we don't need access to advanced AI systems right now to start preparing for their arrival. What data are you generating right now that you could proactively collect to help fuel future AI initiatives?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Scientists Created Bacteria With a Synthetic Genome. Is This Artificial Life?

What it is: In an effort to understand how genes encode proteins and fundamentally create life, a team led by Jason Chin at the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Britain has rewritten the DNA of the bacteria Escherichia coli to create an synthetic genome 4x larger than anything previously created. Part of what Chin wanted to explore was how genes encode for amino acids and how genetic redundancy works: six snippets of DNA encode for serine, for example. To find out why, the team treated the genome like a text file, finding and replacing codons and reducing the total variation to just four. That new synthetic genome was inserted into a cell, and surprisingly, the synthetic version remained alive.

Why it's important: As we digitize biology, we're uncovering new truths about genomics. This may lead to organisms that produce novel medicines or other valuable molecules as living factories.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

SpaceX Launches 60 Prototypes Of Its Starlink Satellites Into Orbit

What it is: On Thursday night, SpaceX successfully deployed 60 prototype satellites for its Starlink constellation. Starlink is a large-scale development effort by SpaceX to develop a low-cost satellite and accompanying ground stations (to receive signals from the satellites), with the goal of establishing a new space-based global internet communication network. Last year, SpaceX received approval from the US FCC to fully deploy 12,000 Starlink Satellites over the next decade. The company expects development, manufacturing, and deployment to cost over $10 billion in that time span.

Why it's important: Starlink’s prototype deployment is a small step for its connectivity business, but a giant leap for humanity toward communications abundance. As Peter often says, if you want to make a billion dollars, discover a way to help a billion people. By turning our species into a hyper-connected organism, Elon Musk and SpaceX will help billions of people come online and participate in the global economy. In the process, they will generate significant revenue (estimates place Starlink revenue at over $30 billion per year once deployed) to further fund Musk’s vision for colonizing the solar system.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Experimental Brain-Controlled Hearing Aid Decodes, Identifies Who You Want To Hear

What it is: Even in the noisiest environments, our brains can pick out an individual voice and amplify it over others. Yet some of the most advanced hearing aids still struggle to achieve this brain hack, instead amplifying all voices at once. Columbia engineers might now have a solution. Building on a previous discovery that in a two-person conversation, the speaker’s brain waves begin to resemble those of the listener, researchers first leveraged neural networks to create an algorithm that separates out individual voices (from a group). Once separated, these inputted voices are then individually compared to the listener’s brain waves (monitored via implanted electrodes). Lastly, any speaker whose voice pattern most closely resembles the listener’s brain waves is amplified over all others.

Why it's important: A remarkable win for deep learning and brain-imitating mathematical models, this system might soon render a universally decoding mechanism, no longer constrained to pretrained voices or a cacophony of many. As explained by senior author Dr. Mesgarani, “By creating a device that harnesses the power of the brain itself, we hope our work will lead to technological improvements that enable the hundreds of millions of hearing-impaired people worldwide to communicate just as easily as their friends and family do." With promising test results, the team now aims to transform their prototype into a noninvasive device and grant true versatility to hearing-impaired individuals in any environment.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Advancing AI By Teaching Robots To Learn

What it is: Facebook AI is experimenting with robotics to push the limits of what AI can accomplish. Facebook and teams from UC Berkeley and NYU are working on systems that are learning to walk on their own and to learn from touch to manipulate objects effectively. At the heart of all of these approaches is a model driven by a curiosity reward function that seeks to learn by reducing uncertainly in the immediate environment.

Why it's important: Facebook’s idea is that by developing self-supervising systems that interact with the real world -- where the data is noiser and conditions more uncertain than cleanly labeled data sets — we will be able to develop more robust robotics as well as AI systems that can generalize across modalities and learn more efficiently.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Robotics health google Artificial Intellegence robots communication communications SpaceX satellites biotech automation
12 min read

Abundance Insider: May 17th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on May 17, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Tomato-picking robots, BCIs for addiction treatment, and a lab-on-a-chip for studying the microbiome.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Amazon's New Machines Pack Boxes Up To 5x Faster Than Humans

What it is: Amazon has revealed that it is piloting warehouse automation technology from Italian firm CMC SRL. CMC’s CartonWrap machines can pack up to 700 boxes per hour, and are already in use at JD.com, Shutterfly, and Walmart. Early projections estimate that each machine could replace as many as 24 roles in each fulfillment center, in addition to the cost and time to train new packing employees in roles with high turnover. Amazon expects that “the efficiency savings will be reinvested in new services for customers, where new jobs will continue to be created.”

Why it's important: We’re no longer expecting that robotics will automate many laborious, routine, and potentially dangerous jobs—that time is already here. As this happens, it’s critical to highlight the messaging around the rollout, which focuses on safety, reinvestment, and the high employee turnover in fulfillment center jobs. How can you emulate this approach as you roll out politically and socially sensitive future initiatives?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Human Gut Microbiome Physiology Can Now Be Studied In Vitro Using Organ Chip Technology

What it is: Up until now, it has proved extraordinarily challenging to study direct interactions between the human microbiome and intestinal tissue in the lab. However, researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute have now leveraged ‘organ-on-a-chip’ technology for an effective new solution. The team first employs its Intestine Chip, comprised of two parallel microchannels divided by a porous membrane—the upper channel containing human intestinal epithelial cells, and the lower channel hosting vascular endothelial cells from intestinal microvessels. The team then establishes an oxygen gradient across the two channels, providing high oxygen levels to the chip’s intestinal epithelium and endothelium, and low levels to the bacteria-inhabited lumen. In a remarkable feat, the Intestine Chip was found to stably maintain microbial diversity in direct contact with human intestinal tissue for a full 5 days.

Why it's important: As explained by team lead and the Wyss Institute's Founding Director Donald Ingber, “This new anaerobic Intestine Chip technology now provides a way to study clinically relevant human host-microbiome interactions at the cellular and molecular levels under highly controlled conditions in vitro." No longer relying on mere correlational studies between disease and bacterial DNA in human stool samples, researchers’ effective use of organs-on-a-chip affords us a powerful new tool to understand the ways in which human gut flora profoundly affect human health and disease.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Experimental Surgery Gains Support As Opioid Deaths Rise

What it is: Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been used for years in the treatment of Parkinson’s and other movement-related disorders. Now, doctors at Shanghai’s Ruijin Hospital are seeing promising results in the treatment of opioid addiction. Five of eight patients in China have stayed off heroin for at least two years, and a patient who received a device six months ago has been off drugs for the duration. A number of factors have led to delays in experimentation in Europe and the U.S., including the high cost of devices ($100,000 in the U.S. vs $25,000 in China), difficulties in recruiting patients, and failed attempts to use DBS in the treatment of depression, which altered the risk-reward balance in the U.S. China, however, is moving ahead. To date, eight clinical trials have been registered throughout the world, six of which are in China.

Why it's important: Most of the concern in experimentation outside of the U.S. centers on the ethical risks of implants and surgery. While it’s important to note the cultural differences here in perception of a massive problem (which seems to carry a higher cost in China), as more devices are implanted, we’ll gain a much better understanding of how the brain functions overall. Follow this line of research, whether you’re exploring the potential of BCI or the treatment of other disorders.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

This Robot Picks Tomatoes Without Bruising Them And Detects Ripeness Better Than Humans

What it is: Massachusetts-based startup Root AI has developed its first agricultural robot, the Virgo 1, an expert tomato picker. Geared with sensors, cameras and onboard lights for nighttime harvesting, this self-driving robot can autonomously navigate huge commercial greenhouses, regardless of the time of day. Operated by its AI software brain, Virgo 1 then detects which tomatoes are sufficiently ripe for harvest, now with a success rate higher than that of humans. Once the right candidates are chosen, Virgo 1’s dexterous robotic hand can pluck tomatoes without bruising them or tearing down connected vines. Made from a food-safe, easy-to-clean plastic, these robotic fingers are even designed to eliminate the spread of mold, viruses or insects, protecting clean crops from faulty counterparts.

Why it's important: Virgo’s sensors and grippers can be reconfigured, and its AI software rewritten, to handle any number of crops. As noted by Root AI’s CEO Josh Lessing, “It’s a complete mobile platform enabled to harvest whatever you need.” Today, farmers spend over $34 billion per year on agricultural labor in the U.S. alone. Swiftly disrupting this labor-intensive sector, however, is a global smart agriculture market projected to reach nearly US$24 billion in value by the end of 2025. Already, exponential technologies from synthetic biology to computer vision are closing in on traditional agriculture from all directions, and AgTech robots like Virgo 1 are poised to become tomorrow’s harvesters.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Wireless Network Brings Dust-Sized Brain Implants A Step Closer

What it is: Brain computer interfaces (BCI) of the future that enable high-fidelity, high-speed brain-to-computer communications will require a decentralized wireless network of thousands of nano- to micro-scale units embedded throughout our neural system. Engineers from Brown University, Qualcomm, and the University of California at San Diego presented a communication scheme to overcome the critical issue of coordinating communications between these decentralized BCIs. Their system will allow two-way communication between each BCI unit and an external device at a rate of 10 Mb/s uplink and a downlink rate of 1 Mb/s. The engineering team dubbed their 0.25-square-millimeter implants “neurograins.”

Why it's important: Over the past year, we’ve featured incredible breakthroughs in BCI technologies. While these breakthroughs are technological marvels, they are rudimentary compared to the everyday BCIs we’ll see later in the 21st century. As Ray Kurzweil predicts, and as these researchers are taking active steps to achieve, we’ll soon have thousands of nanobots monitoring and regulating every aspect of our physiology -- from our brains to other vital organs. In the age of rapidly advancing artificial intelligence, will networks of nanoscopic BCIs provide humans the next evolutionary boost needed to thrive alongside and coevolve with hyperintelligent machines?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, a Singularity University Program, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, is an online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics health robots Amazon Brain computer interface automation bci brain machine interface
14 min read

Abundance Insider: May 10th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on May 10, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Agile automatons, trillion-sensor energy storage, and 3D-printed "breathing" lungs.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Watch This Hulking Robot Play “The Floor Is Lava”

What it is: Robots are now playing sleepover games. Last year, Boston Dynamics unveiled Atlas, a humanoid robot capable of navigating a parkour-style obstacle course. Now, IHMC Robotics has developed a set of algorithms that allows Atlas to autonomously walk across wobbly cinder blocks and suspended wooden planks, a task resembling the kids’ game “the floor is lava.” Using LIDAR to build a map of the area it’s supposed to traverse, Atlas uses the algorithm to determine each step it should take to reach the other side. Atlas is successful about 50 percent of the time, and IHMC expects to increase that rate through improvements to the robot’s balance and the range of motion.

Why it's important: Advances in sensors, AI, and robotics are developing faster than you might think. Just six years ago, we marveled at Atlas' ability to walk on rough terrain, and just two years ago, it has been able to do backflips. As hardware and algorithms progress, look for Atlas-like robotics to begin serving as avatars for humans in dangerous scenarios or to explore remote destinations like Mars.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Ford Brings VR To Its Design Department With Co-Creation Tool

What it is: Ford has developed a Co-Creation tool with Gravity Sketch that allows its engineers to work on the same project in virtual reality (VR), even if thousands of miles apart. In an effort to streamline design and development projects, Ford’s new tool entirely circumvents the 2D design stage, enabling engineers across Ford’s North America, Asia and Europe design studios to plug into the same 3D virtual replica of auto models. As a result, engineers in different global markets can inhabit a standard international model in VR and implement regional preferences at minimal cost and multiplied speeds.

Why it's important: A fast-growing phenomenon in the automotive industry, the use of advanced, professional VR platforms in auto development is delocalizing, demonetizing and even democratizing a traditionally slow and expensive process. As stated by Ford, “The Co-Creation feature adds more voices to the conversation in a virtual environment, which results in more efficient design work that may help accelerate a vehicle program’s development.” However, Ford is not alone. While Italian motorcycle manufacturer Ducati leverages VR to help decide between projects, others such as supplier Magna implements VR to reduce costs and place engineers in different continents on the same project.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Stretchable Carbon Nanotube Supercapacitors Might Be The Future Of Wearable-Device Power Sources

What it is: With batteries dying every 3 to 10 years, how will we sustainably power trillions of sensors deployed in every facet of our lives? Researchers at Michigan State University developed highly stretchable supercapacitors that might solve this massive challenge facing the onset of a trillion-sensor economy. The supercapacitors -- an energy storage alternative to batteries -- are based on carbon nanotubes, a one-dimensional nanomaterial with exceptional mechanical and electronic properties. Using the highly flexible nature of carbon nanotubes, these supercapacitors can be isotropically stretched to over 800 percent of their initial length. Whereas prior flexible supercapacitors can only be meaningfully stretched in one direction, these new carbon nanotube energy storage devices are stretchable in two sets of directions. Multidimensional flexibility is critical to creating robust wearable and devices that can conform to nominal movement of the human body.

Why it's important: As we approach the trillion-sensor economy, we need more robust power solutions for our devices. Over 900 million batteries will need to be swapped out every day to sustain the trillion-plus sensors in service. What alternative energy harvesting and energy storage solutions do you think are most promising?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

New Video Shows 3D Printed Lung “Breathing”

What it is: Our organs depend on intricate networks of different types of blood vessels that carry vital nutrients. This complex network of capillaries is one of the main challenges in 3D printing and replicating human organs. Using a modified version of stereolithography (SLA), researchers solidified a cell-filled hydrogel into a network of blood vessels. What enabled previously unachieved vessel complexity on this project is how the researchers controlled their vessel formation. In short, they deployed an off-the-shelf food dye to block part of the SLA light source. This enabled the researchers to achieve the fine-scale resolution necessary to make functional blood vessels. Using this technology to create lung-mimicking air sacs, the researchers can: (1) pump deoxygenated red blood cells into these lab-printed blood vessels, (2) facilitate the transfer of oxygen to the blood cells, and (3) observe how much oxygen the blood cells absorb.

Why it's important: With over 100,000 people on the U.S. organ transplant waiting list, bioprinting has the potential to solve a massive organ shortage. A few weeks ago, we saw the world’s first beating 3D printed heart. In the coming years, these individual regenerative medicine technologies will converge to enable the first full-scale, operational 3D-printed human organs.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldbberg 

Researchers Make Organic Solar Cells Immune To The Ravages Of Water, Air And Light

What it is: Researchers at NYU’s Tandon School of Engineering have discovered a novel method that makes organic solar panels more resistant to oxygen, water and light, without weighing them down via encapsulation. Instead of applying a protective coating, the research team uses an adhesive tape to strip electron-accepting molecules (specifically, a fullerene derivative called PCBM) from the top surface of the solar cell’s photoactive layer. Currently, the oxidation of fullerene derivatives is a key culprit in device degradation. By removing PCBM from cells' exposed film surfaces, however, the team can thereby eliminate the challenge of oxidation by oxygen and water. In success, their process removes a whopping 94 percent of PCBM acceptor components, rendering a polymer-rich surface for multiplied impermeability.

Why it's important: Currently, organic cells are highly vulnerable to moisture, oxygen and even the very sunlight they seek to capture. However, protective encapsulation of the cell often reduces efficiency, increases unit weight and drives up costs of production. In a double win, the NYU team’s discovery fortifies organic solar cells by reduction, catalyzing scale-up and impenetrability. With a major advantage over traditional silicon solar cells, these organic iterations are highly flexible, ultra-lightweight, and are comprised of much more readily accessible materials. With a market projected to grow over 20 percent between 2017 and 2020, organic solar cells may soon find their way into our windows, screens and even mobile devices.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Brain-Machine Interfaces Could Give Us All Superpowers

What it is: Last week, the documentary film I Am Human premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, chronicling the stories of three people pursuing experimental brain-computer interfaces (BCI) to help them regain what each has lost. Stephen, who lost his eyesight in adulthood, opts to implant a chip underneath his eye that hooks to electrodes in his brain. Anne, suffering from Parkinson’s, pursues deep brain stimulation to help suppress the parts of the brain leading to tremors. And Bill, a tetraplegic after a bicycle accident, is testing out an interface to allow his brain to communicate directly with electrodes implanted in his arms and hands. The film also saves time to interview the scientists and entrepreneurs behind these developments and explore what might be possible in the near future.

Why it's important: This documentary is a reminder that the future is already here, just not evenly distributed. Several hundred thousand people are already using some form of BCI today. Early adopters must consider big risks; by recording patients as their stories unfold, I Am Human allows us to empathize with their situations. How can you use those emotional insights to deliver better services or understand challenges your customers and stakeholders are facing?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider 3D Printing Materials Science health healthcare Stem Cells wearables Brain computer interface mHealth bci brain machine interface
15 min read

Abundance Insider: May 3rd, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on May 3, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Pollution-eating artificial trees, AR contact lenses, and a "brain decoder" that turns thoughts into speech.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Bulleit Brings 3D Printing Tech To Tribeca For A New Whiskey Experience

What it is: Bulleit Frontier Whiskey is displaying what it calls a ‘3D printed experience’ at the Tribeca Film Festival. The display includes robotic arms that ‘print’ cocktails. Essentially, as you can see from the accompanying GIF, the robot places patterns of beads infused with different cocktail flavoring into the whiskey.

Why it's important: Experiential marketing frequently brings out the most engaging displays of exponential technology. This project by Bulleit Frontier Works is a prime example of corporate innovation and tech experimentation within the food and beverage industry. From augmented reality e-commerce to artificial intelligence-powered customer service, how can your company leverage the technologies we feature in this digest to tap into new customer bases and drive more value?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

Electric Car Price Tag Shrinks Along With Battery Cost

What it is: Thanks to the development of large-scale manufacturing in batteries and electric drivetrains, the cost of electric vehicles continues to drop, shortening the date for when analysts project EV’s will reach cost parity with internal combustion engines. Today, BloombergNEF projects that the crossover point is 2022, sooner than its projections of 2026 (in 2017) and 2024 (in 2018).

Why it's important: Demonetization will have dramatic positive effects for the proliferation of passenger EVs, the elimination of fossil fuels, and the feasibility of large-scale batteries for use cases such as shipping, construction and aircraft. This also highlights both the importance and difficulty in forecasting exponentials. Said Greg McDougal, CEO of Harbor Air Ltd, “we don’t want to be trying to get through the regulatory process after [electric aircraft] becomes economically viable, we want to do it now.”  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Scientists Develop ‘Brain Decoder’ That Turns Brain Signals Into Speech

What it is: Termed the ‘brain decoder,’ a new UCSF-developed tool can convert brain signals into a computer simulation of the vocal tract. By first simulating the movement of a speaker’s lips, jaw, tongue and larynx on the basis of brain activity in cerebral speech centers, researchers can then generate speech through a synthesizer. As part of the study, five volunteering epilepsy patients were first set up with brain-implanted electrodes and proceeded to read aloud while researchers tracked brain activity in language production regions. A “virtual vocal tract” was then created for each participant, all feeding an algorithmic synthesizer to generate dramatically accurate audio. In the words of UCSF doctoral student Josh Chartier, “We were shocked when we first heard the results — we couldn’t believe our ears.”

Why it's important: A burgeoning example of brain-computer interfaces (BCI), this brain decoder and its soon-to-come successors pose extraordinary implications for speech-impaired individuals. Up until now, the best available speech synthesis technology has been constrained to eye-tracking devices or those that map residual facial muscle movements. Words are spelled out letter-by-letter, delivered at under one tenth the rate of natural speech. Now with the promise of a clinically viable device, anyone suffering from speech loss — whether as a result of ALS, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s — may soon gain a voice for seamless communication. What other BCI applications can you think of?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by John de Rivaz / Written by Claire Adair 

Scientists Share Results From NASA's Twins Study

What it is: NASA’s Twin Study entered into its final stages of integrative research in April, publishing a summary paper in Science explaining some of the key findings from the 10 research teams involved in the effort. The study — which compared the health of Scott and Mark Kelly during and after Scott’s yearlong stay in space — gives us a better understanding of the effects of space missions longer than six months. Unexpectedly, Scott experienced some significant changes in telomere dynamics, with more long telomeres post-flight than he had previously. Scott’s overall gene expression differed somewhat from Mark's during the flight, but reverted to baseline after returning to Earth; additionally, researchers found some indication of inflammation and thickening of the carotid arterial wall, which are suggestive of atherosclerosis that may not be reversible.

Why it's important: This research will guide NASA’s Human Research Program for years to come and give insights into the planning of longer missions on the ISS, the Moon, Mars and beyond. To the extent that telomere length is an indicator of longevity, space travel may not have the same negative impact on lifespan as one might expect. This study raises many questions about why telomeres grew longer, and whether these conditions could be replicated on Earth.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by David Ormesher / Written by Jason Goodwin and David Ormesher 

Toddler Skin Cells Spark Discovery Of 2 New Diseases

What it is: Researchers from Montreal’s Douglas Mental Health University Institute and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center have newly identified the link between a mutation in epigenetic regulator ACTL6B and two neurological genetic diseases. Prior to their joining forces, the Douglas Institute’s Carl Ernst and his team had harvested skin cells from toddlers with inexplicable seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits. By ‘reprogramming’ the skin cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the researchers were able to make neurons from the iPSCs, compare them to healthy neurons, and thereby discover an ACTL6B mutation implicated in irregular neuronal development. As a result, iPSCs and CRISPR have now accelerated the discovery of one key culprit in the incidence of epilepsy and neurodevelopmental problems, giving way to future research.

Why it's important: Less than 10 years ago, the cost of genome sequencing was 10 times what is today. CRISPR-Cas9 had not yet been adapted for genome editing, and the reprogramming of human cells to iPSCs had only just been pioneered. Today, all three have begun to play a pivotal role in discovering the origins of disease and developmental disorders. Beyond their newfound illumination of the mechanics of cellular development, iPSCs and CRISPR genome editing allow us to identify mutations at record speeds, experiment with genetic alterations and even one day prevent mutation-resulting diseases in the first place. Welcome to an age of biological self-mastery.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

World’s First ‘BioSolar Leaf’ To Tackle Air Pollution In White City

What it is: Arborea, a startup spun out of Imperial College London, has created the world’s first “BioSolar Leaf,” a living structure capable of removing greenhouse gases and other pollutants from the air. At its core, the leaf is essentially a cultivation system for microalgae, diatoms and phytoplankton on large solar panel-like structures, which can be installed on land, buildings or other developments to improve surrounding air quality. Using the surface area of a single tree, the system can remove carbon dioxide and produce oxygen at a rate equivalent to 100 trees. The team also expects to harvest the biomass to extract additives for plant-based food products.

Why it's important: The most exciting developments in exponential technologies occur at the intersection of disciplines. As we saw last week with the creation of transparent wood, biology and materials science are converging to deliver solutions to some of our largest challenges in the areas of environmental health and food production.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

DARPA: This Smart Contact Lens Could Give Soldiers Superpowers

What it is: Researchers at French engineering school IMT Atlantique have developed the first smart contact lens that includes a standalone, flexible microbattery. In this version of the prototype, the flexible battery can power a small LED for several hours. Impressively, near-term iterations of this small-scale device will be able to receive visual information wirelessly via radio signals. In the long term, these lenses are slated to form the backbone for next-generation augmented reality eyewear.

Why it's important: Eventually, smart lenses like these will have profound implications for industry (from manufacturing to healthcare) and everyday life. DARPA and other government agencies are particularly interested in how this smart contact lens breakthrough will help them augment soldiers’ operational capabilities. What new capabilities and ‘superpowers’ are you excited to access when smart contact lenses hit the consumer mainstream?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Materials Science health Artificial Intellegence environment healthcare Augmented Reality Stem Cells wearables Brain computer interface mHealth electric vehicles marketing nasa
17 min read

Abundance Insider: April 26th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Apr 26, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Tesla robo-taxis, eco-friendly transparent wood, and Alphabet's Wing drones get FAA certification.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire, Max and Nora

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

P.P.P.S. I am looking for a talented university student with an exceptional ‘Hacker’ skillset to join me this summer for an out-of-this-world internship experience. Do you know any talented university student entrepreneurs, innovators, and makers who would be a great fit for the role? Please share. Click here to learn more and apply now.

Tesla Takes Aim At Uber And Lyft With Plans To Roll Out 1 Million Robo-Taxis By Next Year

What it is: This week, Elon Musk revealed that Tesla plans to roll out autonomous Robo-Taxis by next year. While he acknowledged the massive regulatory hurdles ahead for this project, Musk said that “Next year for sure, we will have over 1 million Robo-Taxis on the road.” Once rolled out, Tesla owners will be able to offer their cars onto the ‘Tesla Network’ via the Tesla mobile App, so that other people can use it in a ridesharing fashion similar to Uber and Lyft. Tesla estimates Tesla owners will be able to earn over $30,000 per year from offering their car as a Tesla Network Robo-Taxi. “The fundamental message that consumers should be taking today is that it is financially insane to buy anything other than a Tesla,” he said.

Why it's important: Earlier this year, Lyft saw a massive IPO with a current market cap of over $16 billion. Uber is expected to go public with a valuation of over $90 billion. Now, Tesla is entering the game to disrupt this already-disruptive industry. With millions of autonomous-ready cars already on the road, Tesla is well equipped to transform the ridesharing landscape. With its new autonomous plans, Tesla is set to dramatically undercut Uber and Lyft ($0.18 per mile vs. $2 to $3 per mile), a boon to Tesla owners and ridesharing customers alike. Billions of dollars worldwide are being pumped into R&D to make autonomous cars commonplace. How will you leverage this colossal opportunity?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Max Goldberg 

Alphabet’s Wing Drones Get FAA Approval For U.S. Package Delivery

What it is: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has awarded Alphabet-owned drone delivery startup Wing the first Air Carrier Certification. With this certification, the U.S. officially joins Canberra, Australia, where Wing has been testing delivery drones since 2014. The permit enables Wing to deliver goods from local businesses to homes, even flying over civilians and out of the drone operator's line of sight. In “the coming weeks,” Wing will begin a pilot program in the Blacksburg and Christiansburg areas of Virginia.

Why it's important: Delivery drones will transform how we move products around the planet. These vehicles remove the energy inefficiency of moving heavy steel trucks simply to deliver small packages. They also enable rapid point-to-point delivery of essential goods (e.g. medicines, blood plasma), creature comforts (e.g. toilet paper, toothpaste, shampoo) and, importantly, takeout food and groceries. With on-demand autonomous delivery, what essentials will you order directly to your door?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

This “Transparent Wood” Could Cut the Cost Of Heating Your Home

What it is: A research team led by Celine Montanari at the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm has invented a type of transparent wood that can absorb and release heat, making it an ideal construction material for energy-efficient buildings. To advance previous work in transparent wood -- created by removing the lignin from Balsa wood and replacing it with an acrylic to provide strength -- the team added polyethylene glycol to the acrylic, which melts under high temperature and hardens as it cools. According to Monetary, 100 grams of this transparent wood material with the polyethylene glycol inside can absorb up to 8,000 joules of heat, which is roughly what a 1W bulb can produce in two hours.

Why it's important: Materials science and biology aren’t just converging in health sciences, but in construction and manufacturing. Produced at scale, this transparent wood could revolutionize energy-efficient architecture. What technology breakthroughs in adjacent industries might solve a challenge in your business?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Jason Goodwin 

FDA Grants First-Ever Clearances To Detect Bradycardia And Tachycardia On A Personal ECG Device

What it is: AliveCor, the company pioneering portable ECG monitoring with KardiaMobile, announced this week that it has received FDA clearance for the detection of Bradycardia and Tachycardia, two arrhythmias that are not Afib and between 40-50 or 100-140 beats per minute, respectively. As expected, patients often become frustrated when results from their ECG devices deliver “inconclusive” or “undetermined.” While low and high heart rates are often benign — such as during sleep (low) or exercise (high) — delivering a clear classification provides patients and their doctors more insight into their care.

Why it's important: Thanks to advances in sensor technology, machine learning, and the ubiquity of smartphones, we're witnessing an explosion in wearables that deliver health insights outside of the hospital and emergency room. (KardiaMobile retails for $100 online and via Amazon.) As FDA and other regulatory agencies continue to foster trust in the market, look for similar announcements in other conditions.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Just 10% Of U.S. Plastic Gets Recycled, But A New Kind Of Plastic Could Change That

What it is: Achieving a number of difficult design specs, researchers have just developed a plastic with special chemical properties that make it perfect for repetitive recycling. Most notably, the plastic has a chemical bond that allows easy separation from additives and conversion to a pure, reusable end product. A tweaked type of glass-like plastic called vitrimer, the material is held together by dynamic covalent diketoenamine bonds that require significantly less energy to break than those of traditional plastics. Yet while a solution of water and a strong acid at room temperature is all that is needed to break down the plastic into its constituent parts, the plastic is also safe from decomposition ahead of schedule, giving it the edge of biodegradable plastic without risk of easy degradation.

Why it's important: Today, a mere 10 percent of all plastic waste is recycled in the U.S., while the remaining refuse continues to populate waterways and landfills at an accelerating pace. Scientists project that a staggering 8 million metric tons of plastic pollution make their way to oceans each year, enough to place 5 grocery bags of plastic waste on every foot of every nation’s coastline. Current plastics and traditional recycling methods produce precious few materials with any value to commercial manufacturers. However, by chemically redesigning plastics to render their recycled constituent parts as good as new, we might be on the alchemist’s cusp of turning trash to treasure. Could this new material be our long-awaited miracle plastic?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Waymo Is Building A Self-Driving Car Factory In Detroit

What it is: Alphabet subsidiary Waymo has just announced its selection of a Detroit-based facility to serve as the company’s first dedicated factory for autonomous vehicles. Aiming to move into the facility by mid-year, Waymo will partner with American Axle & Manufacturing to repurpose what was most recently used as a sequencing center for a local parts supplier. Soon to undergo a tremendous upgrade, the factory will next serve as a manufacturing site for SAE Level 4 autonomous vehicles, those driving forward Waymo’s autonomous ride-sharing fleets. Granted approval by Michigan Economic Development Corporation in January, the factory will now be able to build out thousands of self-driving cars under Waymo’s partnership with Magna, including autonomous versions of the all-electric Jaguar I-PACE and the Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid minivan.

Why it's important: Bridging the time gap between Detroit’s vehicle-sprouting heyday and the start of a self-driving era, Waymo’s soon-to-be refitted facility marks a committed first step in the scale-up of autonomous ride-sharing fleets. After the recent launch of Waymo One this past December in the Phoenix area, the limited commercial robotaxi service has already expanded at a remarkable pace, hinting at a paradigm shift in the way consumers view car ownership. And as autonomous ride-sharing launches begin to spread across the country and to urban centers abroad, Waymo will be one of many giving rise to a new age of personal transportation.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Meet The 5 Winning Prototypes In Phase II Of The $2M GoFly Prize

What it is: GoFly, the $2M+, two-year global competition to create a safe, quiet, and ultra-compact personal flyer, just awarded prizes to five teams across the globe for their winning prototypes in the latest phase of the competition. Through partnerships with Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, and 20 international aerospace organizations, GoFly is reinventing the future of transportation. GoFly’s 3,500 Innovators from 103 countries are creating their jet packs, flying motorcycles, human-carrying drones, and futuristic flyers-- all culminating in next year's Final Fly-Off when the teams gather to showcase their innovations and fly them for the world.

Why it's important: GoFly's Phase II announcement brings us one step closer to making the dream of human flight a reality. With the convergence of breakthrough technologies and recent advances in propulsion, electrics, rapid prototyping, sensors and control systems, and lightweight materials, GoFly’s engineers are leveraging these technologies and GoFly’s mentorship platform to create transformative mobility. When the GoFly Final Fly Off takes place next year, these personal flyers will have the ability to transform the way first responders provide aid in natural disasters, packages are delivered, commuters move from home to office, recreational users fly for fun, and athletes participate in all new flying sports. The Final Fly-Off is a year away, so for those interested in forming a GoFly team, please contact info@goflyprize.com.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Nidhi Chaudhary / Written by Gwen Lighter 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

 
Topics: Abundance Insider Materials Science health Artificial Intellegence environment healthcare Drones self-driving cars wearables mHealth electric vehicles
14 min read

Abundance Insider: April 19th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Apr 19, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Dedicated self-driving car lanes, 3D printed tiny hearts, and Sweden's electric car-charging roads.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Nora, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Israeli Scientists 3D-Print A Tiny, Live Heart Made With Human Tissue

What it is: For the first time, an Israeli team led by Professor Tal Dvir successfully 3D-printed a tiny, but beating, heart entirely from human cells. The heart is complete with muscles, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers. The cells used to print the heart came from a donor’s fat tissue, changed into embryonic stem cells, and finally differentiated into the various types of heart tissue used in the printing process. The differentiated cells were loaded into a bioprinter, which took 3 to 4 hours to print the small heart. After several days of incubation with oxygen and other nutrients, the cells in the heart began to beat spontaneously. Future advancements and research could lead to 3D-printing a full-sized heart appropriate for humans.

Why it's important: Using a patient’s own cells to make a heart may resolve the immune-rejection issues that currently cause nearly 40 percent of heart transplants to fail. Organ shortages disappear when we have the ability to 3D-print organs. As self-driving cars, Internet of Things and AI technologies help us live longer, safer, and healthier lives, we'll have fewer donors from car accidents, meaning fewer donated organs to the hundreds of thousands of people on transplantation waiting lists. If we can precision-print organs, will we one day be able to reengineer these evolution-driven devices to be more efficient? Imagine 3D-printed lungs optimized for air intake, or hearts designed to be resistant to heart attacks.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

China’s Rolling Out Dedicated Highway Lanes For Self-Driving Cars

What it is: According to KPMG, China is currently ranked 20th in the world on its Autonomous Vehicle Readiness Index. To step up its game, the country is developing new road infrastructure with dedicated autonomous lanes. Slated to begin operation in 2020, the first stretch will be a 100 km road connecting Beijing with the Xiongan New Area in Hebei province. The road will embed sensors and electronic tolls that aid in the development of autonomous technology and facilitate easy payment for cab-hailing companies that begin to rely on driverless vehicles.

Why it's important: The idea of dedicated autonomous road infrastructure has been floated in U.S. near Foxconn’s new plant in Wisconsin and in Seattle, without action. Dedicated lanes may not be necessary for true autonomy development, but they would help avoid accidents in the short term, and likely accelerate the expansion of a new vehicles and services provider to the market. If successful, this experiment will provide real-world data for city planners who replicate this idea elsewhere.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Jason Goodwin 

A Prominent Publisher Used Machine Learning To Write A Textbook

What it is: Scientific journal publisher Springer Nature just released the first machine generated textbook by a scholarly publisher. Developed by the Applied Computational Linguistics (ACoLi) lab at Goethe University in Frankfurt, “Lithium-Ion Batteries: A Machine-Generated Summary of Current Research” is an attempt to distill insights from the vast amount of research in the area. According to Springer, over 53,000 papers on Lithium Ion batteries have been published in just the last three years. While there is an element of human quality control in the training phase, the algorithm condenses and organizes the preapproved, peer-reviewed publications into coherent chapters and sections, giving researchers just 180 pages to review and consider versus 100,000+.

Why it's important: Exponential technologies are converging, their fundamental research is accelerating, and we’re bringing another 4 billion people online in the next few years. Developing tools to remain abreast of research across a wide set of topics is more critical than ever. How can you use this and other machine learning algorithms to spot or spark new ideas?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Device Tests Thousands Of Stem Cells Super Fast

What it is: UChicago’s Institute for Molecular Engineering has just developed a “lab-on-a-chip” (LOC) that can study thousands of live stem cells, understanding how each reacts to different molecules and environments. For years, credit card-sized microfluidic devices — composed of tiny chambers, channels and valves — have been used to study reactions in numerous cells. However, while predecessors sported limited chambers and failed to keep cells alive for long-term experimentation, this team’s new microfluidic device has achieved a 15-fold increase (from 100 to 1,500) in the number of automated chambers over existing counterparts, allowing the LOC to perform experiments that would take more than 1 million steps in a traditional lab.

Why it's important: While the tool itself is impressive, its newly enabled experiments have already yielded consequential insights. The researchers even gleaned new rules that determine timing and signaling sequences necessary for stem cell differentiation or renewal, all by examining neural stem cells on the device and analyzing resulting data. With dramatic implications for our understanding of brain development and corresponding treatments, this finding demonstrates just how quickly LOC technology could accelerate stem cell research, unlocking high-throughput experimentation at a fraction of the cost. Yet advanced microfluidic devices are doing more than dematerializing and demonetizing stem cell research; they are now on the cusp of eliminating time, perhaps one of the most stubborn barriers of all.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Researchers Use Drones To Detect Potholes, Cracks, And Other Road Damage

What it is: A pre-print research paper published to Arxiv.org describes an AI-enabled quadcopter that performs road inspections. The AI system is trained to detect cracks and potholes on city roads. Engineers mounted a stereo camera (a camera with multiple lenses) on a DJI Matrice 100 drone to capture images of the road. These images were then fed through an AI system trained to compare the 3-dimensional depth of real-time images to baseline reference images. The difference between the anticipated baseline and real-time images are plotted on so called ‘disparity’ maps. As seen in the GIF to the left, these systems output a reconstructed surface of the road, and identifies areas of the road that need to be repaired.

Why it's important: Drones are just exiting the Deceptive phase of Peter’s 6 D's and entering into the Disruptive phase, with transformative implications. As this story shows, a skyful of drones complemented by thousands of micro imaging satellites will provide real-time analysis of all aspects of our world, from pothole inspection to city traffic analysis to weather patterns and wildfire detection. How will you and your company leverage the abundance of imaging data that drones and microsatellites are making accessible right now?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Sweden Is Building A Road That Recharges Electric Buses That Drive On It

What it is: Reimagining electric vehicle (EV) charging from the ground up (literally), the Swedish transport administration is now experimenting with electric dynamic charging roads. In a $12.5 million showcasing project, the Smart Road Gotland consortium will pilot a 1-mile stretch of e-road between Sweden’s Gotland Island airport and the town of Visby, capable of charging electric trucks and buses as they run over it. Funded primarily by the Swedish government, the project will leverage a Dynamic Wireless Electrification System developed by Israeli company Electreon, a driving lane-embedded infrastructure that powers vehicle batteries wirelessly.

Why it's important: With the goal of building out 2,000km of additional electric dynamic charging roads, Sweden aims to transform one of the nation’s arterial highways into a heavy transport e-road. In success, Electreon’s and others’ commercialized e-road technology could soon pave the way for not only always-charging vehicles, but electric public transport and even low-emissions long-haul trucking. As noted by Electreon VP of business development Noam Ilan, “[this] is the first time ever that a heavy truck will charge wirelessly from the road.” A burgeoning market with unparalleled potential, electric roads may one day leave no transit industry vertical untouched, and no vehicle uncharged...  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Sensors health Artificial Intellegence healthcare Drones trillion sensor economy self-driving cars China Stem Cells electric vehicles israel
15 min read

Abundance Insider: April 12th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Apr 12, 2019

 

In this week's Abundance Insider: Smart sleepwear, herbaceous cyber agriculture, and a new wonder material.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Nora, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

'Smart' Pajamas Could Monitor And Help Improve Sleep

What it is: Researchers at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst developed self-powered “smart” pajamas that monitor heart rate, posture and breathing. This highly cross-disciplinary project packs five sensors into a lightweight, unobtrusive form factor. The team tapped into materials scientists to develop the energy-harvesting, self-powering materials and computer scientists to process the abundance of data. The team estimates this technology could make it to the mainstream by 2021 for under $200.

Why it's important: We are in a wearables co-evolution, in which humans are incorporating increasingly powerful wearable technologies into their physical survival, longevity and everyday habits. This booming industry is having a massive impact on the $29 billion sleep industry. From the Oura Ring to smartwatches and sensor-equipped mattresses, we are collecting massive amounts of important sleep data. These smart pajamas could help more robustly collect and analyze full-body sleep behavior. What might you learn about yourself based on your sleep data?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

Meet Borophene, The Boron-Based 2D Wonder Material That Is A Close Cousin Of Graphene

What it is: Borophene is a single layer of boron atoms that combine to form 2-dimensional lattice structures of varying shapes. Predicted in the early 1990’s but not produced until 2015, its properties are just now being characterized — and the results are impressive. Stronger and more flexible than graphene, borophene is a good conductor of heat and electricity, and can be superconducting. According to Zhi-Qiang Wang at Xiamen University in China, “its conductivity, the material’s high theoretical specific capacities, excellent electronic conductivity and outstanding ion transport properties” make it a great candidate as an anode for Li, Na, and Mg batteries. And because hydrogen atoms stick or adsorb easily to borophene, it also shows potential for hydrogen storage and other water-based energy cycles.

Why it's important: As with graphene, we must discover how to produce borophene at scale. If successful, however, a wide range of applications become possible, ranging from battery storage breakthroughs to new environmental sensors for gases like formaldehyde and ethanol. As more characteristics are defined, keep an eye out for new applications that might benefit your MTP.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Alexa, What's My Blood-Sugar Level?

What it is: Amazon’s Alexa home assistant recently received a major medical update. Now, Alexa devices can securely handle users’ sensitive medical data. The new features include connecting to wireless blood glucose monitors, scheduling doctor’s appointments, and passing on prescriptions and follow-up instructions from your doctor after a visit. With personal data privacy a growing concern, Amazon is aiming to achieve compliance with HIPAA and other federal patient data standards.

Why it's important: Data is 21st century gold, especially in healthcare and longevity. Recognizing the importance of healthcare data, massive tech companies like Apple, Google and Amazon are heavily investing in the industry. Will you entrust Alexa with your personal medical records?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Idaho Power Announces Record-Low Price For Power From Solar Farm

What it is: Idaho Power has secured a 20-year deal to buy power from a 120MW solar farm built by Jackpot Holdings at $21.75 per megawatt-hour (MWh). This brings the price to a mere 2.2 cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh), a record low for solar in the United States. Idaho Power will be able to use its existing transmission lines coming from the North Valmy coal plant in Nevada, set to be retired in 2025. Getting to 2.2 cents per kWh requires using the federal solar Investment Tax Credit, but even without the subsidy, the average should be around 3 cents per kWh, roughly half of the 6 cents per kWh average for utility-grade solar just two years ago.

Why it's important: As Singularity University Energy Chair Ramez Naam notes, in two more doublings, we’ll see solar prices in the Western U.S. cheaper than the fuel price of natural gas plants — without subsidies. Considering the simultaneous phase-out of legacy fossil fuel infrastructure, we are well on pace to achieving abundant, cheap, and clean sources of energy. What new opportunities open up when power costs are no longer a constraint on your investment decisions?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Innolith Energy Technology Brings 1000km EV Within Range

What it is: A key catalyst for electric vehicle (EV) technology, Innolith AG has just announced its work on the first-ever 1,000 Wh/kg rechargeable battery. In success, the Innolith Energy Battery would thereby be able to power an EV for over 1,000 km (or over 620 miles) on a single charge. While current battery technologies typically employ a transition metal oxide cathode and a graphite anode, which both depend on the intercalation of lithium ions, the cathode material restricts the battery’s capacity and energy density. By instead using conversion reaction materials, Innolith AG has developed an innovative cell chemistry mechanism that gives way to cell-level energy densities never before possible.

Why it's important:  Innolith’s novel Energy Battery has unprecedented implications for the future of EVs. By both eliminating reliance on rare and expensive materials, and achieving an unparalleled energy density, Innolith AG will be able to dramatically slash costs of battery technology, driving down barriers for EV popularization. Its use of a non-flammable inorganic electrolyte would also make it the world’s first non-flammable lithium-based battery for EV use — a tremendous feat for enhanced safety. As synthesized by Innolith AG CEO Sergey Buchin, “Consumers want an adequate range on a single charge in an affordable EV, and confidence that it is not going to catch fire.” This breakthrough might be the answer.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

MIT’s ‘Cyber-Agriculture’ Optimizes Basil Flavors

What it is: In a soil-breaking study out of MIT's Media Lab and the University of Texas at Austin, researchers have now used machine learning to optimize artificial climate conditions for a more flavorful basil. Aiming to automate farming, the researchers use cyber-agriculture, or contained agricultural environments, to play with patterns of light, water, nutrients, temperature and other ecological variables, thereby changing the phenotypic expression of plants. Applied to basil, the team’s machine learning model determined that 24/7 exposure to UV lights would increase flavor concentration, and sure enough: after following the model’s “climate recipe,” experimental basil saw doubled flavor-producing molecules, dramatically increasing its tang.

Why it's important: A remarkable application of machine learning and cyber-agriculture, this climate-optimized flavor-bursting basil demonstrates that AI can even be applied to sensory experience and culinary refinement. With the growing need for large-scale, accessible and intelligent food production, vertical, hydroponic and AI-optimized farming methods will become ever more critical for feeding the next billion. And as cyber-agriculture allows us to tune and tweak environmental growth conditions, machine learning can help us optimize everything from plant mass, edible yield, nutrient density, and even flavor.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Energy Materials Science Sensors food health agriculture healthcare materials Amazon trillion sensor economy voice assistants wearables future of food voice
11 min read

Longevity & Vitality - Part 5: The Three R’s of Regenerative Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 24, 2019

Lizards can regrow entire limbs. Flatworms, starfish, and sea cucumbers regrow entire bodies.

Topics: 3D Printing Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare bio-printing biotech Stem Cells entrepreneur regenerative medicine vitality
10 min read

Longevity & Vitality Part 4: The Next Data-Driven Healthtech Revolution

By Peter H. Diamandis on Feb 17, 2019

Increasing your healthspan (i.e. making 100 years old the new 60) will depend to a large degree on artificial intelligence.

Topics: Abundance Data Sensors AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare mobile health preventive medicine digital devices aging mHealth
7 min read

Longevity & Vitality Part 3: AI Augments Healthcare and Longevity

By Peter H. Diamandis on Feb 10, 2019

When it comes to the future of healthcare, perhaps the only technology more powerful than CRISPR is Artificial Intelligence.

Topics: Abundance AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare preventive medicine Stem Cells protein-folding aging
8 min read

Longevity & Vitality Part 2: A Renaissance of Drugs and Genomics

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jan 20, 2019

The causes of aging are extremely complex and unclear.

Topics: Abundance AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare preventive medicine Stem Cells protein-folding aging
6 min read

longevity & vitality part 1 - why we age....

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jan 13, 2019

Healthcare today is reactive, retrospective, bureaucratic and expensive. It's sick care, not healthcare.

Topics: Abundance AI Medicine/Health Longevity health healthcare preventive medicine Stem Cells protein-folding aging