8 min read

Increase your healthspan, now.

By Peter H. Diamandis on Oct 18, 2020

There are actions you can take right now to increase your potential healthspan, with a target of making it to a health 100+ years old.

Topics: Entrepreneurship Exponentials Mindset Longevity Abundance 360 Artificial Intellegence healthcare Genetics CRISPR exponential technology
6 min read

100 years old will be the new 60

By Peter H. Diamandis on Oct 11, 2020

For the first time in history, leading scientists and entrepreneurs believe there’s a way to slow aging -- and maybe even reverse it.

Topics: Entrepreneurship Exponentials Mindset Longevity Abundance 360 Artificial Intellegence healthcare Genetics CRISPR exponential technology
7 min read

revolutionizing drug discovery and delivery

By Peter H. Diamandis on Jul 19, 2020

If you had to guess how long it takes for a drug to go from an idea to your pharmacy, what would you guess? 3 years? 5 years? How about the cost? $30 million? $100 million?

Topics: Entrepreneurship Exponentials gene therapy gene Technology Artificial Intellegence preventive medicine personalized medicine Genetics CRISPR genetic engineering genome sequencing
6 min read

revolutionizing drug discovery and delivery

By Peter H. Diamandis on Dec 15, 2019

If you had to guess how long it takes for a drug to go from an idea to your pharmacy, what would you guess? 3 years? 5 years? How about the cost? $30 million? $100 million?

Topics: Entrepreneurship Exponentials gene therapy gene Technology Artificial Intellegence preventive medicine personalized medicine Genetics CRISPR genetic engineering genome sequencing
6 min read

The CRISPR Revolution & Hyper-Personalized Medicine

By Peter H. Diamandis on Dec 12, 2019

Two revolutionary tools are overhauling healthcare as we know it today: genome sequencing and CRISPR engineering.

Topics: Entrepreneurship Exponentials gene therapy gene Technology Artificial Intellegence preventive medicine personalized medicine Genetics CRISPR genetic engineering genome sequencing
8 min read

Abundance Insider: October 28th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Oct 28, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Google's quantum computing breakthrough, a new gene-editing technique, and NASA's collaboration with Caterpillar on Moon mining machines.

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and home in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, includes 100+ hours of coursework and video archives for entrepreneurs like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

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New gene editing technology could correct 89% of genetic defects.

What it is: Researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have now developed a new gene-editing technique called “prime editing.” Built upon the foundations of CRISPR technology, prime editing has the expected potential to correct up to 89 percent of genetic defects, including those responsible for diseases like sickle cell anemia. By combining the traditional CRISPR-Cas9 approach with a protein that can generate new DNA, prime editing can thereby both snip DNA strands and transfer edited sequences to target DNA, allowing scientists to delete and replace whole sections of DNA strands.

Why it’s important: Single point gene mutations constitute roughly two-thirds of known human genetic variants associated with disease. As a result, effective gene editing techniques—once perfected—could correct mutations and wipe out a number of debilitating conditions. As explained by one of the authors of the study, Andrew Anzalone, “The versatility of prime editing quickly became apparent as we developed this technology [...] The fact that we could directly copy new genetic information into a target site was a revelation.” Now refining the new prime editing technique, Broad Institute’s scientists hope future iterations of CRISPR could target everything from obesity to Alzheimer’s to some of today’s most vexing genetic maladies. |Share on Facebook.

NASA's collaborating with Caterpillar on Moon mining machines.

What it is: NASA has recently teamed up with autonomous construction vehicle manufacturer Caterpillar to develop machines for excavating and mining the Moon. The two have long collaborated on robotics projects, but it is the autonomous capabilities of Caterpillar’s vehicles that make the company uniquely positioned to develop technology for NASA's lunar exploration programs. According to NASA spokesperson Clare Skelly, “there are many synergies between what NASA needs to meet exploration goals and Caterpillar technologies used here on Earth.”

Why it’s important: On the heels of revived interest in lunar exploration and the goal of establishing a lunar base, NASA has been heavily pursuing methods to make tasks easier for astronauts. Given multiple hazards associated with navigating the lunar surface, semi-autonomous vehicles could minimize dangerous construction work done conducted directly by astronauts. Once validated and fully autonomous, Moon-mining machines might one day provide a continuous supply of raw materials, from dust to water, for NASA’s proposed lunar outpost. | Share on Facebook.

Tesla’s new Solar Roof costs less than a new roof plus solar panels, aims for install rate of 1K per week.

What it is: Tesla has just launched its third-generation Solar Roof for residential home use. Planning to start installations in the coming month, the company is now aiming for a production rate of up to 1,000 new roofs per week. Long a work in progress, Tesla’s Solar Roof is designed to double as both an aesthetically appealing roof tile and set of home power-generating solar panels with high surface area coverage. While the installation process remains “very non-trivial,” according to Elon Musk, Tesla hopes to gamify consumer installation learning through ‘installathons’ and is investing in R&D to lower this critical barrier.

Why it’s important: Although individual tiles’ power-gathering cells are still less energy-efficient than traditional solar cells, version three of the Solar Roof well exceeds the energy-generating capacity of similarly sized roofs retrofitted with traditional tiles, on balance. Furthermore, V3 marks a tremendous improvement over previous iterations of the Solar Roof, and Musk forecasts a total addressable market of up to 100 million households globally. As installation procedures plummet in complexity and cost, and solar continues to demonetize, self-sustaining and energy-efficient residences could fast become the norm worldwide.

Google Confirms Achieving Quantum Supremacy.

What it is: Google’s quantum computer, Sycamore, has just claimed “quantum supremacy” after completing a computation that would normally take 10,000 years on the most powerful supercomputers, in just 200 seconds. Led by experimental physicist John Martinis at UC Santa Barbara, the Google team published its feat in Nature magazine this week. Instead of traditional semiconductor computers, which store data in 1s or 0s, quantum bits (qubits) can exist in a third superposition state of both 0 and 1 simultaneously. With more degrees of bit variability, quantum computers can thereby perform exponentially more calculations per second than traditional computers. Quantum entanglement, described by Einstein as “spooky action at a distance,” then allows computers to measure entangled qbits at the same time. As Google’s Sycamore contains 54 qbits capable of storing over 10 quadrillion combinations of values, the tech giant now boasts the potential to tackle computational problems inconceivable in the past.

Why it’s important: While real-world applications of quantum computing may lie further on the horizon, Sycamore’s scientific achievement is a tremendous milestone for the many companies investing in this space already. In just the last two years, about US$400 million has been channeled towards private quantum-related firms—doubling investment figures of the past five years. Intel and IBM have demonstrated processors similar in scale to that of Sycamore, yet error-checking remains an issue for all three. Moving forward, Google aims to implement full error-checking once it can create processors with at least a million qubits. Currently, however, a second Google team is exploring how Sycamore-like computers can develop machine learning algorithms that generate realistic images. Meanwhile, competitor IBM offers quantum cloud access to partners such as drugmaker Merck. Even Airbus Ventures has invested in quantum startup IonQ, which may eventually aid in aircraft physics simulations. Spanning countless applications, the long-term vision of early investors in quantum computing will pay off sooner than you might think. |Share on Facebook.

Want more conversations like this?

Conversation with Tony Robbins: Join me on Wednesday, October 30th at 12pm PT for an incredible conversation with Tony Robbins. We'll be discussing moonshots and mindsets, how to transform industries and cultures, and how to leverage technologies to dramatically improve your personal life and business success. Save your spot here.

Abundance 360 is a curated global community of 360 entrepreneurs, executives, and investors committed to understanding and leveraging exponential technologies to transform their businesses. A 3-day mastermind at the start of each year gives members information, insights and implementation tools to learn what technologies are going from deceptive to disruptive and are converging to create new business opportunities. To learn more and apply, visit A360.com

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Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics google solar solar energy autonomous vehicles Genetics CRISPR quantum computing nasa solar cells solar power solar roof extraplanetary colonies genetic engineering Caterpillar
12 min read

Abundance Insider: August 3rd, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Aug 3, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: SpaceX Starhopper's successful test hop, emotion-reading AIs, and SoftBank's second Vision Fund.

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and home in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital, a Singularity University Program, includes 100+ hours of coursework and video archives for entrepreneurs like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

P.P.P.S. This week, in partnership with Sergey Young, my team at XPRIZE released a powerful Impact Roadmap outlining The Future of Longevity. I highly recommend taking a look. Click here to dive in.

SoftBank’s Second Vision Fund Is Set To Invest Over $108 Billion In AI Startups

What it is: SoftBank Group has just announced the launch of its $108 billion (to date) Vision Fund 2, dedicated to AI-based technology. Attracting a notable list of investors, the fund has achieved participation from limited partners Apple, Foxconn and Microsoft, among others. SoftBank itself will invest $38 billion in the fund (or approximately 35 percent of current funds). While already surpassed by its successor, SoftBank’s first Vision Fund offers a strong precedent, having yielded a 62 percent internal rate of return (IRR).

Why it’s important: Beyond an oncoming surge in capital flows to AI ventures and R&D, the Vision Fund 2 could solidify SoftBank’s position as the most influential international investor. The new fund is also slated to alter dynamics between startups, investors and corporate players like Microsoft, while decreasing SoftBank’s reliance on Saudi Arabian funds. Having invested in 24 out of 377 global unicorns, SoftBank now aims to retain its historically strong betting game and help birth a new generation of AI-driven disruptors. | Share on Facebook.
 

SpaceX Starship Prototype Takes 1st Free-Flying Test Hop

What it is: Dubbed Starhopper, SpaceX’s Starship prototype successfully completed its first untethered test flight last Thursday in Boca Chica, Texas. Resembling a large water tower with three legs wrapped in stainless steel, Starhopper ignited its single Raptor engine, conducting a straight hop to 65 feet (20 meters), then lowering itself back down in a controlled manner.

Why it’s important: Starhopper is a significant test bed for novel technologies underpinning SpaceX’s Starship and Super Heavy, which together constitute the company’s heavy-lift, fully reusable, high-capacity launch system and spacecraft. Designed to carry up to 100 people at a time, Starship could one day conduct multi-purpose trips to the Moon, Mars, and beyond, according to Musk. At the micro level, Starhopper thereby demonstrates the crucial role of rapid prototyping and iterative design in expediting (literal) moonshots. Yet at the macro level, SpaceX’s successful test — not to mention its rapid manufacturing of two full-scale ‘Mark 1’ Starships — are a testament to the booming revival of private space exploration | Share on Facebook.

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

What it is: Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics are now conducting the first-ever publicly recorded human study using CRISPR to treat a genetic disease. Striving to develop an effective therapy for patients with sickle cell disease, doctors first extract cells from patients’ bone marrow. These cells are then genetically modified with CRISPR to produce fetal hemoglobin, intended to counteract the defective proteins that result in sickle-shaped blood cells and thereby hinder oxygen transport. Patients next undergo the same chemotherapy administered as part of a standard bone marrow transplant. Yet once this process wipes out defect-carrying cells, patients receive billions of their own CRISPR-edited cells (as opposed to those contributed by a donor).

Why it’s important: This study marks significant progress on two fronts: not only is it an initial, formalized step in validating CRISPR’s use in human therapeutics, but it could pose tremendous implications for long-term treatment of sickle cell disease. As explained by Dr. Haydar Frangoul, “The hope is that [CRISPR] will provide a treatment option for all patients, including those who can’t find a matched donor.” By leveraging a patient’s own cells, this and similar CRISPR treatments could expand the field of personalized medicine and render quantifiable extensions of the human healthspan. | Share on Facebook.

Tesla’s Megapack Battery Is Big Enough To Help Grids Handle Peak Demand

What it is: Tesla’s new Megapack battery can store up to 3 megawatt hours (MWh) of energy at a time, while using only 60 percent of the space and one tenth of the components required by comparable energy storage units. If strung together, however, a sufficient number of Megapacks could theoretically provide over 1 GWh of energy storage. According to Tesla, this would be “enough to power every home in San Francisco for six hours.” Already, Tesla reports it will deliver fully-assembled Megapacks to utility firms like Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), which initially plans to deploy the batteries in Monterrey Bay, California.

Why it’s important: Today, “peaker” power plants are often responsible for providing energy when peak demand exceeds local electrical grid capacity. Yet Tesla’s highly efficient Megapacks could soon offer a more stable alternative. Particularly as Tesla’s new battery can be assembled ten times more quickly than alternative solutions, Megapacks are well-positioned for deployment at scale vis-a-vis established utility companies. Even though Tesla’s solar panel installation rate reached an all-time low in Q2 2019, the company’s focus on energy storage ventures continues to surge: both Powerwall home batteries and industrial Powerpacks reached record high deployment rates this year. As Megapacks begin populating the market, our societal shift toward renewable energy sources may soon pick up speed.| Share on Facebook.

AI Is Getting More In Touch With Your Emotions

What it is: EmoNet, a deep neural network model developed by researchers at Duke University and the University of Colorado, can now classify images into distinct emotional categories. Using parameters like color, spatial power spectra (think: one’s facial ‘layout’), and the presence of objects or stimuli, the AI can then classify an image featuring almost any facial expression into one of eleven distinct emotional categories. Developed using a database of 2,185 videos spanning 27 emotion categories, EmoNet is even capable of distinguishing expressions indicative of “craving” and “horror.”

Why it’s important: While AI may not (yet) be capable of appropriating human emotions, innovations like EmoNet indicate the technology’s increasing ability to discern and act upon human expression data. Perhaps most notably, emotion-reading AIs could play a tremendous role in clinical trial data analysis, scientific survey design, and even mental health diagnoses. Researchers who previously relied on self-reports of emotional state now have an objective and qualitatively accurate tool at their disposal. As elaborated by lead researcher Phillip Kragel, “Moving away from subjective labels such as 'anxiety' and 'depression' towards brain processes could lead to new targets for therapeutics, treatments, and interventions.”  | Share on Facebook.

Scientists Cook Up New Recipes For Taking Salt Out Of Seawater

What it is: Researchers from the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a new form of “thermally responsive” ionic liquids capable of desalinating salt water. Yet instead of using electricity, these ionic liquids use thermal energy, rendering a far more cost-effective solution than traditional desalination techniques. Partnering with the Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry, the team discovered that the proximity of an ionic liquid’s organic components to its positively charged ions has a direct impact on the number of water molecules it can extract from seawater. Once tweaked accordingly, the team’s ionic liquid samples were able to separate freshwater from salt with far greater efficiency.

Why it’s important: Today, over 2 billion people rely on drinking water sources contaminated with human waste, and projections indicate that nearly half the world’s population will live in water-stressed areas by 2025. 72 percent of the Earth’s surface is covered in water, yet contemporary desalination systems remain highly energy-intensive. Now, however, innovations such as the Berkeley Lab’s modified ionic liquids could give rise to low-cost, scalable desalination — converting one of our most abundant commodities (seawater) into one of our most vital resources. | Share on Facebook.

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by my team of entrepreneurs and technology scouts, including contributions from standout technology experts and innovators.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, a Singularity University program, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital, a Singularity University program, is an online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Energy AI Artificial Intellegence capital SpaceX biotech Genetics CRISPR rockets energy storage energy abundance water softbank
14 min read

Abundance Insider: April 5th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Apr 5, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Barista bots, ultrafast phone charging, and disposable delivery drones.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Baristas Beware: A Robot That Makes Gourmet Cups Of Coffee Has Arrived

What it is: To bring ‘connected coffee’ to the mainstream, coffee startup Briggo engineered a robotic coffee barista called Coffee Haus. The goal of the Coffee Haus project is for customers to quickly order their ideal cup of coffee via a smartphone app, receive a notification when the cup of joe is ready, and then pick up a cup of coffee that is precision-engineered to the customer's specifications and preferences. Through a robust array of inbuilt sensors, the Briggo bot manages almost every aspect of the coffee experience, from milk temperature to the usage rate of coffee cup lids. Briggo’s complex robotics and robust sensor and IoT technology converge to output as many as 100 cups of made-to-taste coffee in an hour.

Why it's important: While the future of food is filled with impactful exponential technologies, consumers will likely directly interact with robotics first. Practically speaking, the 100 cups of coffee Briggo’s system outputs in an hour is about equal to the production rate of 3-4 baristas combined. Unlike human baristas, though, Briggo’s system does not take a salary or experience fatigue, and all of its actions are predetermined and monitored. (A larger social question emerges: When a robot prepares and delivers you a gourmet steak dinner, would you still leave a tip?)  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

McDonald’s Uses A.I. To Tempt You Into Extra Purchases At The Drive-Thru

What it is: Dynamic Yield, an Israel-based artificial intelligence startup, has partnered with McDonald's to deploy its "decision technology" within electronic menu boards at over 1,000 drive-thru locations within the next three months. The smart menu boards will dynamically change based on fators like the user's existing order, the weather, and how busy the restaurant is. McDonald's CEO Steve Easterbrook plans to eventually roll the technology out to all 14,000 U.S. restaurants and international locations, perhaps even with inbuilt license plate recognition to incorporate a customer's recent orders.

Why it's important: In 2018, McDonald's generated almost $6 billion of net income serving around 68 million customers per day. This represents a massive data set on which to train machine-learning algorithms. Leveraging this abundance of data to personalize and streamline the customer experience will no doubt add to the $4.2 billion in free cash flow McDonald's reported at the end of 2018. What gold lies in your company data -- and how can you use it to make better business decisions?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Marissa Brassfield 

Xiaomi’s 100W Charger Fills A 4,000mAh Battery In 17 Minutes

What it is: Xiaomi has developed a superfast 100W charger that takes a 4,000mAh battery — almost twice the capacity of an iPhone X — from zero to 100 percent in just 17 minutes. Details on the technology are still under wraps, particularly around heat dissipation, battery life, and whether it's tied to a specific manufacturer, but this represents an almost 2X improvement over the previous best.

Why it's important:  Rechargeable batteries have become ubiquitous in everyday life. Just as next-gen batteries and charging networks will eliminate "range anxiety" in electric vehicles, this 100W charger could similarly remove location barriers for cellphone users. How might a charger of this nature transform humanitarian efforts, or help researchers maintain 24/7 uptime in remote or inaccessible regions?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

These Autonomous Bots Battle Blazes Too Dangerous For Firefighters

What it is: As part of a five-year Japanese project to design responses to disasters in energy and heavy industries, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHi) has created a Water Cannon Bot capable of fighting blazes autonomously in hard-to-reach and otherwise dangerous locations. The Cannon Bot and its companion Hose Extension Bot are built on farm buggy frames and can deliver foam or water at 4,000 liters per minute at 1 megapascal (MPa) of pressure. The duo is part of a larger autonomous system that includes surveillance and reconnaissance technologies onboard a larger transport vehicle to help fight the blaze.

Why it's important: Autonomous robotics are rapidly improving, and we’re seeing a large number of early use cases in areas deemed too dangerous for humans. (Think failing nuclear reactors or space exploration.) Watch for these to potentially ease public concerns around automation, and generate insights for expansion into new, less-dangerous use cases. How can you use this approach in your own endeavors?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Disposable Delivery Drones Pass Test With US Marines

What it is: Under contracts with DARPA and the U.S. Marine Corps, Logistic Gliders Inc. has developed a single-use, autonomous glider resupply system that can carry up to a whopping _1,800 pounds_ of supplies. Constructed from low-cost plywood, the disposable glider’s two versions (LG-2K and the smaller LG-1K) are projected to cost as little as a few hundred dollars each if cleared for mass production. Suited for long distances, the gliders are first launched from a larger aircraft and then either fly and navigate autonomously or are operated by a remote pilot. Granted new flexibility, the drones can even fly through urban environments, jungle canopies, or almost any low-altitude clearing, delivering critical supplies precisely where needed.

Why it's important: A significant achievement in the longstanding pursuit of advanced drone delivery technology, these Marines-tested gliders could soon outpace both ground-based delivery drones in speed, and air-dropped supply parachutes in cost. As explained by principal investigator Marti Sarigul-Klijn, “Gliders dropped from a cargo aircraft could greatly outdistance any ground-based unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) designed for cargo logistics,” particularly given the long range of glider-carrying aircrafts. With a now-multiplied range, cargo weight capacity, and ultra low cost, Logistic Gliders and similar drone technologies offer tremendous promise for everything from low-cost, high-volume humanitarian aid supply to precise commercial drone deliveries.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Google And University Researchers Are Using Deep Learning To Discover Exoplanets

What it is: As AI joins forces with today’s leading astronomers, one convolutional neural network, AstroNet K2, has helped researchers discover two new exoplanets among a trove of NASA’s Kepler telescope data. Building upon research by Google AI’s Chris Shallue and Harvard astrophysicist Andrew Vanderburg, AstroNet K2 has helped overcome a major obstacle in analysis of Kepler’s data. Given a mechanical malfunction that rendered the telescope incapable of focusing on a single part of the sky, sporadic data collection has made it difficult for astronomers to identify the best exoplanet candidates. Now, while the neural network still returns numerous false positives, it has reportedly achieved a 98 percent accuracy rate in test data sets of images with promising characteristics.

Why it's important: While AstroNet K2 cannot yet be entrusted with detecting and identifying planet candidates entirely on its own, the neural network and its successors will likely prove decisively valuable in the pursuit of exoplanet discovery. By rapidly sifting through tomes of Kepler imaging data, AstroNet K2 massively reduces the number of signals for human astronomers to analyze, making the collaborative process much less time-consuming. Now the first-ever neural network to be successfully applied to K2 data, AstroNet K2 will be open-sourced after further refinement, enabling a broader AI community to dive in.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Robotics AI space exploration Artificial Intellegence Drones Batteries Genetics future of food
12 min read

Abundance Insider: March 30th, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 30, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: Record-breaking CRISPR engineering, apple-harvesting robots, and an advanced prosthetics hand.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Toyota's Planned Moon Rover Has 18x The Range Of A Tesla Model S

What it is: Japanese automaker Toyota and JAXA, the Japanese space agency, recently announced a collaboration to further develop lunar mobility technology. The partnership commits more resources to accelerate and develop a pressurized lunar rover powered by a hydrogen fuel cell. Using Toyota’s fuel cell technology, the vehicle will have an anticipated cruising range of 6,214 miles, nearly equivalent to the entire circumference of the Moon and more than double the width of the United States. Using the ‘live off the land’ principle of in-situ resource utilization, the hydrogen fuel cells allow the rover to readily refuel from rich hydrogen and water deposits on the Moon, without the need to bring added fuel for the rocket launch.

Why it's important: This partnership demonstrates the massive terrestrial impact of space exploration. From the invention of CMOS imaging sensors to freeze-dried food, space continues to catalyze hyper-impactful innovation for use on Earth and beyond. By developing its fuel cell technology for the demanding environment of space, Toyota will also inevitably demonetize and democratize these innovations for its global consumer base.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

Doctors Wired A Prosthetic Hand Directly Into A Woman’s Nerves

What it is: For the first time ever, doctors in Sweden have successfully wired a sentient prosthetic hand directly into a patient’s nerves. With an osseo-neuromuscular implant, the recipient can now control the prosthetic’s fingers with her mind and even perceive tactile sensations. To achieve this extraordinary feat, surgeons placed titanium implants in the patient’s forearm bones and connected an array of sixteen electrodes to her nerves and muscles. This enables both extraction of signals to control the prosthetic hand and a corresponding sense of touch. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and biotech firm Integrum AB additionally built the prosthetic hand with unparalleled dexterity, now pictured tying shoelaces and even typing on a computer.

Why it's important: Coordinated by European prosthetics research program DeTOP, this breakthrough has remarkable implications. Up until now, prosthetic hands have been stifled by limited dexterity and sensory feedback, requiring users to rely on vision for everyday use. By implanting electrodes directly into a user’s nerves, however, researchers can now electrically stimulate them similar to the way in which a biological hand conveys information. Such technology not only dramatically enhances dexterity but could also drive development of robotic devices that seamlessly interface with our bodies. No longer partially connected tools, prosthetic limbs are now integrating directly into our biological architecture, revolutionizing the way we communicate with technology.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Gaz Alazraki / Written by Claire Adair 

Photos From NASA's Opportunity And Curiosity Rovers Reveal 15 Martian Objects That Resemble Mushrooms

What it is: As published in the Journal of Astrobiology and Space Science, images from NASA’s rovers Curiosity and Opportunity reveal evidence of life, specifically algae, lichens and mushrooms growing and emerging from Martian soil. According to the authors, the mushroomlike structures such as stems and stalks -- spotted by the hundreds -- aren’t something created by known geologic forces on Earth. While evidence isn’t confirmation, when coupled with additional of evidence of seasonal fluctuations in methane on Mars, this suggests there may be existing life on Mars.

Why it's important: Better data, enabled by increasingly powerful sensing technology, is giving us an unparalleled glimpse into environmental conditions around the universe. This new knowledge recalibrates researchers' understanding of the fundamentals for life, and will no doubt spur additional exploration and data-gathering activities. What long-held assumptions about the universe will we confirm or challenge in the decades ahead?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Abundant’s Apple Harvesting Robots Get Their First Commercial Deployment

What it is: This week, Abundant Robotics announced its first customer, and the first commercial use case of its apple-harvesting robots. To commercialize its technology, Abundant overcame a handful of complex technical challenges simultaneously, including image recognition of harvestable apples, picking the fruit without damaging it, and real-time autonomous navigation of different orchards. Over the three years since Abundant Robotics’ launch, partnering with orchards around the world to acquire real-world data during product development and testing was critical to accelerating the robots’ commercial viability.

Why it's important: From lab-grown meat to genetically engineered crops, digital agriculture is transforming the global food supply chain. This news from Abundant Robotics further validates the wide-ranging applications of converging exponential technologies like robotics, artificial intelligence and big data to help feed the planet.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

Genome Engineers Made More Than 13,000 CRISPR Edits In A Single Cell

What it is: Setting a groundbreaking record for large-scale genome editing, researchers at Harvard have just published a method that enables genetic alterations at thousands of loci per cell. Having developed a set of dead-Cas9 base editor (dBEs) variants, the researchers can now circumvent cutting open the DNA double helix at multiple locations, a traditional cause of cell death when too many edits are made at one. By instead using base editors to replace individual genetic letters, the scientists have successfully made 13,200 genetic alterations to a single cell without destroying it in the process.

Why it's important: Given that many genetic elements are repetitive and capable of copying themselves, large-scale, one-stop genome editing could one day eliminate all copies of a retrovirus for safe and universal organ transplants. Gene technologist George Church has even envisioned the creation of human organ and tissue supplies with revised genomes that are immune to all viruses. According to the Harvard team, this ‘recoding’ process would involve about 9,811 precise genetic modifications. With the newfound ability to target all copies of a given genetic element, imagine ‘recoding’ supplies of your own cells, now rendered universal and safe for future transplantation.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Robotics space exploration healthcare biotech Genetics mars moon prosthetics
15 min read

Abundance Insider: March 22nd, 2019

By Peter H. Diamandis on Mar 22, 2019

In this week's Abundance Insider: NVIDIA's latest AI artist, Google's all-neural mobile speech recognizer, and a glimpse into Tokyo's tech for the 2020 Olympics.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Join Peter Diamandis in Dubai, the City of the Future, for the inaugural Abundance 360 Dubai Summit on March 26 - 27, 2019. Hosted by the Dubai Future Foundation and the Crown Prince of Dubai, this two-day experience offers exponential leaders an immersive look into how technology will transform every industry. Read more about the program and apply here to join.

 

Harvard Study Unlocks A Key To Regeneration

What it is: A Harvard research team has achieved a major step in understanding how animals like lizards, worms, and jellyfish regenerate body parts. A few noteworthy results have come out of their investigation into how three-banded panther worms regenerate their entire bodies. The researchers found a “master control gene” called early growth response (EGR), which triggers changes in a complex system of 18,000 other genes during the regeneration process. Without the EGR gene turned ‘on,’ none of the other processes can happen. Humans express the EGR gene, too, and researchers know exactly how to control it. But the human version of EGR does not have the same switching effect that causes regeneration. Along with the fact that only 2 percent of our genome actively generates proteins, this study shows that the result of a specific genome depends on not only the code of the genome, but how that code is connected together.

Why it's important: Since the first human genome was sequenced at the start of the millennium, geneticists and biologists have made exponential progress in understanding how our genetic code operates. As we increase our genetic understanding of how other species regenerate, we’ll gradually extrapolate what we find into human-facing products. From stem cells to bioprinting to genetic engineering, regenerative medicine will be transformative in the decades to come.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Todd Sheerin / Written by Max Goldberg 

Nvidia AI Turns Sketches Into Photorealistic Landscapes In Seconds

What it is: Earlier this week, NVIDIA revealed GauGAN, an early prototype of what TechCrunch hails the “MS Paint for the AI age.” Using a generative adversarial network (GAN) trained on 1 million Flickr images, GauGAN can create photorealistic images from just a few lines drawn by a user. As an example, a user could click on “tree,” draw a line, and GauGAN will create an image of a tree trunk. GauGAN can do the same for the sky, sea, rock, hills, wood, and other objects. NVIDIA built the software on its Tensor-based RDX Titan GPU platform to facilitate near-real-time results, but Bryan Catanzaro, VP of Applied Deep Learning Research, thought the platform could also run on standard CPUs with a slightly longer delay. While NVIDIA hasn’t announced plans for a commercial version, it will likely release a free trial version to facilitate public experimentation.

Why it's important: As we discuss here in Abundance Insider, systems like GauGAN are rapidly democratizing the skills and hardware needed to interface with powerful AI. While a challenge remains in ensuring that these systems are trained on the right data sets, we’re approaching a time when deploying powerful AI models will be as easy as launching a new blog or website. How will you begin to use this capability to drive experimentation within your business?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Ikea Is Making Furniture Better For People With Disabilities — With The Help Of 3-D Printers

What it is: Launching its new ThisAbles project, IKEA has joined forces with nonprofits Access Israel and Milbat to create a line of products that makes furniture accessible to populations with special needs and disabilities. Aiming to make mainstream furniture accessible to all, the joint enterprise has not only identified over 130 products already suited to accommodate users with a range of disabilities, but has designed numerous low-tech add-ons. Think: oversized lamp switches, accessible handles for shower curtains and drawers, or customized hooks and couch legs. Yet while these hacks are only displayed in Israeli IKEA stores, users can now download free blueprint models anywhere in the world to 3D-print add-ons independently and on-demand.

Why it's important: By pairing customized add-ons and 3D printing technology, we can transform almost any mainstream product into one that accommodates the unique needs of users with a range of disabilities. While retailers could design creative hacks in-house, publicly released 3D blueprints would democratize products for any customer, multiplying the range of everyday goods usable by people with disabilities. And just as customers can request tweaks to IKEA’s add-ons, firms might even crowdsource design ideas and feedback, honing product solutions for specific use cases and consumer needs.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Robot Assistants From Toyota And Panasonic Prep For The Tokyo Olympics

What it is: Against the backdrop of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, tech giants including Toyota and Panasonic are working with the organizing committee to showcase a variety of exponential technologies, namely robotics. Toyota will use around 16 autonomous Human Support Robots and 10 Delivery Service Robots to assist spectators with directions, grabbing objects from the floor, or in delivering food. Panasonic plans to showcase about 20 of its power assist exoskeletons to help visitors with luggage and similar lifting tasks. Robotics firm ZMP is hard at work to deploy an autonomous taxi fleet to ferry athletes and spectators around the city. Finally, on the renewables front, NTT has nearly completed an effort to create all of the athletes’ medals from recycled e-waste. Further pilot projects in solar roads and parking lots are underway to help Tokyo meet its goal of powering the Games entirely from renewable sources.

Why it's important: Often, the exponential technologies we need to create abundance are already here but not evenly distributed. Similar to how XPRIZE structures its incentive challenges, this public-private effort from Japan reminds us that sometimes the only thing we are missing is the right catalyst and compelling occasion to overcome initial hurdles.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Google AI Blog: An All-Neural On-Device Speech Recognizer

What it is: Google has just announced the roll-out of a novel breakthrough in speech recognition: its all-neural, on-device recognizer that will power speech input in Gboard. In a new feat for AI, the recognizer’s ML model is trained using RNN transducer (RNN-T). This technology works by continuously processing input samples (voice speech), and outputs symbols as you speak — in this case, characters of the alphabet. The real leap, however, has to do with the storage size required by Google's algorithms. While previous cloud-based speech processing took up 2GB of storage, Google has successfully shrunk its speech algorithm storage demands down to 80MB, rendering its recognizer small enough to fit on your smartphone, and work offline.

Why it's important: In the past, speech recognition programs would have to record inputs, send a request from your device to a remote server, and then wait for a response to translate your sentences into text. Aside from the delays that result from cloud-based processing, this meant that speech algorithms could only allow you to type with your voice while online. By decimating storage requirements, however, Google has now eliminated the burdens of network latency and unreliable service, as its RNN-T recognizer outputs words the second you utter them.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Aaron Levin / Written by Claire Adair 

Stanford Medicine Announces Results Of Unprecedented Apple Heart Study

What it is: Researchers at Stanford Medicine recently revealed the results of a U.S. study of over 400,000 people in all 50 states to evaluate the Apple Watch’s ability to detect atrial fibrillation (AFib). Conducted in partnership with Apple, the eight-month study is the largest of its kind to ever be performed. The results: 0.5 percent of patients received notifications that something might be wrong, and 84 percent of these patients were in AFib at the time of the notification.

Why it's important: As Peter discussed in his Longevity & Vitality blog series, sensor and data abundance are transforming healthcare and medicine. The Apple Watch is Apple’s foray into the world-changing trend of mobile-as-a-medical-service. This study affirms the impact of wearables. For the first time in human history, we can detect early warning signs far before medical issues become deadly; as we live longer, how will you use your added health span to create an exponential impact?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Robotics AI Artificial Intellegence healthcare biotech voice assistants Genetics regenerative medicine voice
14 min read

Abundance Insider: October 26th, 2018

By Peter H. Diamandis on Oct 26, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: Molecular computing biosensors, space botany, and fine dining in virtual reality.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. On November 7th, Abundance Digital will be streaming an exclusive webinar with Tony Robbins. Join us at 12pm PDT to hear Tony and Peter dive in to their initiatives in human longevity and discuss how exponential technologies affect our human purpose. Sign up here. 

Healthy Mice With Same-Sex Parents Born For First Time

What it is: In a new breakthrough for reproductive science, researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have now successfully bred mice with same-sex parents. Born to two mothers, a litter of 29 healthy mice were able to live to adulthood, some even birthing their own offspring. While scientists have previously bred mice with same-sex parents, a mammalian reproduction phenomenon known as “imprinting” has yielded serious birth abnormalities. To overcome this, Dr. Zhou and his colleagues used haploid embryonic stem cells (ESCs), which contain only one set of chromosomes, and deleted specific genetic regions that produce the imprints which turn off paternal or maternal genes. By combining this edited stem cell with an egg cell, the team conferred complete genetic material to a well-formed embryo.

Why it's important: While those mice born to two fathers (using similar methods) survived only a few days, there is evidence that genetic imprinting works similarly in human reproduction, albeit involving different genes. The findings also mark a tremendous leap in understanding genetic barriers to same-sex mammalian reproduction — and offering hope that they might one day be eliminated. As both gene editing and embryonic stem cell research continue to advance, we might one day unlock new paradigms in human reproduction.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Claire Adair / Written by Claire Adair 

DNA-Based Molecular Computing Will Pave The Way For Programmable Pills

What it is: Researchers at the University of Chicago aim to harness untapped information about how our cellular systems work by deploying a series of DNA-based molecular computing circuits. The researchers propose that specific arrangements of these molecular logic gates can give specific analog signals of the concentration of the molecules as they are released over time, opening up the information contained in the temporal portion of our cells’ communication mechanisms. Accessing the time-dependent information of these cellular signals is akin to knowing the tune of a song, rather than solely the lyrics.

Why it's important: As we approach a trillion-sensor economy by 2020, the quality and versatility of these sensors is critical. This research is evidence that rapid improvements in biosensor technology are bringing us deeper layers of data. This higher-order, temporal microbiology data is what we need for meaningful long-term studies of our bodies, and for the development of real-time monitoring and treatment systems. What physiology do you want to precision-monitor -- and therefore optimize, treat, and/or understand -- on a molecular scale?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg 

New Material Could Up Efficiency Of Concentrated Solar Power

What it is: Scientists have identified a material that could dramatically boost the efficiency (and lower the cost) of concentrated solar power. Using mirrors or lenses to focus large amounts of solar thermal energy onto a small area, concentrated solar power involves converting concentrated sunlight to heat up a working fluid, usable to drive turbines. Promising an expected efficiency boost of over 20 percent, steam can even be replaced with supercritical carbon dioxide. But temperatures required of over 1,000 Kelvin also promise to melt many metals or cause them to react with CO2. In a new feat balancing high heat transfer rates and chemical and heat resistance, researchers have refined a composite material called tungsten and zirconium carbide. These materials are extremely effective heat conductors, each with a melting point of 3,700K and the ability to form a complementary pairing.

Why it's important: Boasting much greater resilience than currently used metals, this zirconium carbide and tungsten composite has remarkable economic implications, requiring much less of the material for an effective heat exchanger. Concentrated solar has the tremendous advantage of superior heat storage, allowing the technology to generate power 24/7. By integrating storage in the process of energy production, concentrated solar might pose a more stable way of harnessing the sun.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Virtual Reality Makes Food Taste Better

What it is: Our senses and memories play an important role in how we perceive taste. But it’s not always easy or cheap to put someone on a plane, for example, to run an experiment. Enter researchers at Cornell, who recently used virtual reality to address this problem. They asked 50 participants to eat the same piece of blue cheese in three VR settings: a virtual sensory booth, on a cow farm, or on a park bench. As expected, participants rated a significantly higher pungency of the cheese in the cow barn versus the bench or sensory booth.

Why it's important: As the costs of VR continue to drop, we’re seeing an explosion of new use cases that extend well beyond gaming. While many applications focus on augmenting our abilities to understand complex systems or to collaborate, many others are also tied to cost savings, which should accelerate even broader adoption and catalyze experimentation.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

75% Of People Think This AI Artist Is Human

What it is: A team at Rutgers has created AICAN, an artificial intelligence system trained on 80,000+ works of art over the past 500 years, representing the entire Western canon. It can generate images at the click of a button, without human control. Using what they call a Creative Adversarial Network, or CAN, AICAN generates images of surprising sophistication that 75 percent of humans would never attribute to an AI. The system also generates its own titles, such as “The Birth of Venus” or “St. George Killing the Dragon.”

Why it's important: For the time being, the element that AICAN misses in its art is the social context or desire to make a political statement, something still distinctly human. That will likely change as we begin to refine our quantification of values like creativity. With that in mind, how will artists, and you, use systems like AICAN and its progeny as tools for self-expression?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Space Crops Could Get Boost from Plant Hormone, Study Finds

What it is: On Earth, a plant-fungal symbiotic relationship helps plants absorb nutrients from low-nutrient soil; in return, the plant keeps the fungus healthy by feeding it with carbohydrates. However, this symbiotic relationship degrades in microgravity. University of Zurich researchers promoted this plant-fungal symbiosis, even in microgravity, by treating the plant-fungal system with a synthetic version of the hormone strigolactone. Experiments determined that given this treatment, the plant and fungus were able to thrive even in low-gravity and low-nutrient environments.

Why it's important: One of the key challenges of Moon and Mars mission planners is producing food on other planets. Shipping soil millions of miles from Earth and producing artificial gravity are limited by the laws of physics, so explorers will need to leverage engineering to achieve sufficient crop yields, using entirely alien resources. This research out of Zurich is one of many studies focused on extraterrestrial agriculture. Even on the Moon and Mars, there’s an abundance of resources -- we just need to figure out how to efficiently use these resources to host human life (and one day, civilizations).  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

Topics: Abundance Insider Space Energy Materials Science AR/VR Artificial Intellegence virtual reality materials solar energy nano technology Genetics
14 min read

Abundance Insider: October 19th, 2018

By Peter H. Diamandis on Oct 19, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: Self-balancing bipedal bots, California chatbot regulations and next-gen autonomous farming.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Want to learn more about exponential technologies and hone in on your MTP/ Moonshot? Abundance Digital includes 100+ hours of course work and video archives for entrepreneurs, like you. Keep up to date on exponential news and get feedback on your boldest ideas from an experienced, supportive community. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Inside Silicon Valley’s Newest, Most Autonomous Farm Yet

What it is: Led by CEO Brandon Alexander, formerly of X (formerly Google X), digital agriculture company Iron Ox built a unique robotic farm designed to operate fully autonomously. The company recently transitioned their prototype farm into a full production facility. The first of these farms, situated in a 1,000-square-foot, San Carlos, California-based warehouse, grows romaine lettuce, bok choy, cilantro, and two dozen other types of greens. The farm can produce nearly 30 times more produce than a traditional 1 acre farm and uses 90 percent less water than traditional farming. Iron Ox uses a horizontal, single-floor layout fueled by natural overhead sunlight.

Why it's important: The global food supply chain is highly inefficient. Iron Ox’s scalable, autonomous approach to locally grown food is one of the many digital agriculture solutions bringing farming closer to the table. Produce can travel nearly around the globe before it lands on your plate, resulting in nearly half the cost of food coming from transportation. What if we could dramatically reduce (or eliminate) these costs?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Honda Is Giving Cars The Ability To See Around Corners To Avoid Accidents

What it is: Building out what it calls “vehicle-to-everything” communication (or V2X), Honda is now partnering with the city of Marysville, Ohio to test the company’s Smart Intersection technology. In an effort to address the limitations of existing autonomous vehicle sensors, which cannot see around corners, Honda’s 33 Smart Mobility Corridor project leverages proprietary object recognition software and cameras installed at intersections to provide a 360-degree view of a given street, with distance of up to 300 feet. Intersection-mounted cameras then communicate this data directly to vehicles, allowing them to see around corners and ‘through’ obstructing buildings to preemptively avoid collisions and other threats.

Why it's important: According to Honda’s reported statistics, about 40 percent of all car collisions, and almost 20 percent of the U.S.’ annual 35,000 traffic-related fatalities, take place at intersections. While autonomous vehicles will dramatically reduce these figures, even the most advanced sensors leave gaping blind spots behind adjacent buildings and other obstructions. As smart city infrastructure comes online, however, V2X technology will grant any connected vehicle the data it needs for contextual vision and preventative decisionmaking. Such smart traffic systems can enable a zero-collision record and remarkable efficiency improvements.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

‘Venus Flytrap’ Spheres Catch and Destroy BPA

What it is: Scientists have just developed micron-sized spheres capable of catching and destroying BPA, a synthetic compound used to make certain plastics and resins. Commonly found in coatings inside food cans, water supply lines and bottle tops, BPA has been suspected of damaging children’s health and contributing to high blood pressure in cases of prolonged exposure. One known solution involves reactive oxygen species (ROS), which degrades BPA into harmless chemicals. Leveraging titanium dioxide, which releases ROS when triggered by UV light, researchers built flowerlike spheres composed of titanium dioxide pedals, enhanced with cyclodextrin (a benign sugar-based molecule). And with these new 3- to 5-micron spherical particles of enhanced titanium dioxide, scientists found that only 200 mg of these spheres per liter of contaminated water successfully degraded 90 percent of BPA in only one hour.

Why it's important: As explained by Rice University’s Materials Science, Nanoengineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Pedro Alvarez, “This new material helps overcome two significant technological barriers for photocatalytic water treatment.” One involves the efficiency of water treatment as a result of reducing the scavenging of ROS by other constituents in the water that prevent it from primarily catching and neutralizing BPA. These enhanced titanium dioxide spheres are rechargeable once recovered, allowing them to be separated and reused at low cost. At scale, this material could pose a highly effective solution for decontaminating BPA-tainted water.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

The World’s First Lions Conceived By Artificial Insemination Have Been Born

What it is: Following nearly 18 months of studying the lion reproductive system, researchers at the University of Pretoria achieved a breakthrough: the world’s first African lions born by artificial insemination. Due to declining numbers and inbreeding, lions don’t breed as well in the wild, and the logistics present a challenge to breeding in captivity. This can potentially slow the decline of African lions, whose population has dropped by almost 98 percent over the last 220 years.

Why it's important: Science and technology give us truly superhuman powers -- in this case, the ability to help prevent the loss of endangered and vulnerable species to extinction. How might this breakthrough impact ecology and conservation efforts?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

Robot Masters Human Balancing Act

What it is: Researchers at the University of Texas Austin are leveraging lessons from human biomechanics to optimize biped robots. Their new biped robot Mercury replicates the fine motor skills that allow humans to walk through crowded spaces without bumping into people or objects. In the researchers' words, "[The technique teaches] autonomous robots how to maintain balance even when they are hit unexpectedly or a force is applied without warning." The UT-Austin team translated key human dynamics into a set of math equations used to program Mercury. These underlying equations can, theoretically, be programmed into any AI-powered biped robot to improve its balance. The team recently demonstrated a prototype of this self-balancing biped robot, and last week presented their work at the Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems.

Why it's important: Advanced motor skills may eventually be applied to robots in emergency rescue, defense, entertainment, food service and more. Leveraging lessons from artificial intelligence and biomechanics, we're seeing increasingly humanlike robots under development.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

A California Law Now Means Chatbots Have To Disclose They’re Not Human

What it is: Last month, California Governor Jerry Brown signed SB-1001 into law, requiring companies to disclose to customers when they are communicating with a bot. The new law is intended to cover commercial and political communications in environments like social media, but will likely face significant litigation before it goes into effect next July. For starters, it is not easy to define what constitutes commercial or political speech, and the difference between an automated script used to reply to emails versus a third-party service like Marketo or Infusionsoft is unclear. Regardless of the outcome, as we’ve seen with GDPR in the EU, the world will be watching, as it is difficult to draw geographic lines on the Internet.

Why it's important: This is likely to be the first of many legislative battles around the use of AI and bots in daily lives. What opportunities do you see for increasing trust and transparency into the system to head off the potential for regulatory overreach?  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Jason Goodwin 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

 

Topics: Abundance Insider Artificial Intellegence robots autonomous vehicles nano technology Genetics nanobots
11 min read

Abundance Insider: September 7th

By Peter H. Diamandis on Sep 7, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: Graphene retinas, dancing deepfakes, and CRISPR curbs muscular dystrophy in dogs.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

P.S. Send any tips to our team by clicking here, and send your friends and family to this link to subscribe to Abundance Insider.

P.P.S. Next week, Abundance Digital will be streaming an exclusive webinar with Ray Kurzweil. Join us on September 14th, 12 pm PST to hear Ray and Peter discuss the dangerous ideas that will transform humanity in the 21st century. Register for free here. If you can’t join live, we will send a recording to the email address you provide.

Easy-to-Make Videos Can Show You Dancing Like the Stars

What it is: A team of researchers at UC Berkeley has developed an AI motion transfer technique to superimpose the moves of professional dancers onto any amateur ('target') in seamless video. By first mapping the target's movements onto a stick figure, Caroline Chan and her team create a database of frames, each frame associated with a stick-figure pose. They then use this database to train a machine-vision system called a generative adversarial network (GAN), which generates an image of the target person based on a given stick-figure pose. Map a series of poses from the source video to the target, frame-by-frame, and soon anyone could be a Michael Jackson, a Ginger Rogers or a world-class ballerina — take your pick.

Why it's important: Somewhat reminiscent of AI-generated "deepfakes," this development of full-body motion transfer marks significant progress, largely given the minimal nature of its data inputs. While former AI-driven frame-by-frame image transfers would usually require multiple sensors and cameras to build a 3D picture of someone's pose, Chan and her team are able to use 2D video taken from a single camera, even a smartphone. But aside from this technical advantage, the use of generative adversarial networks in film could tremendously disrupt entertainment, bringing legendary performers back to the screen and granting anyone virtual stardom.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

Graphene Artificial Retinas Could Help Millions See Again

What it is: Presenting at an American Chemical Society meeting, an international team of researchers shared their pioneering work in leveraging the high flexibility and optical versatility of graphene to create artificial retinas. They combined graphene with materials like molybdenum disulfide, gold, alumina, and silicon nitrate to form transparent, flexible structures that can be used to register incoming light signals. While these aren't yet functional, biomedical retina replacements, their ability to register light signals is a foundational first step.

Why it's important: Millions of people currently suffer from retina diseases, and today's artificial implants are rigid and flat -- not the ideal replacement for our flexible, curved natural retinas. More broadly, a transition to carbon-based electronics would leverage the sheer abundance of carbon here on Earth and elsewhere in the universe. Imagine a future in which you can sequester carbon dioxide from the air (CO2 composes over 95 percent of Martian air), separate out the carbon, and print a wide range of electronic (or biomedical) devices at scale.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg / Written by Max Goldberg and Marissa Brassfield 

Nestle is Using DNA to Create Personalized Diets

What it is: In a massive push to acquire cleaner labels and sell healthier products, Nestlé is now piloting a personalized nutrition program in Japan, boasting 100,000 program participants to date. Using AI, DNA testing and meal analysis to collect consumer data on diet and health, the Nestlé "Wellness Ambassador" aims to fine-tune personalized nutrition and extend the lifespan of an aging population. With an annual subscription of roughly $600, participants receive an in-home DNA collection kit, learn about personalized supplements, and can post photos of all their meals in exchange for AI-recommended dietary changes.

Why it's important: As the global population grows older — with over 12 percent aged 60 or older in 2015 — personalized nutrition and functional foods have long become lucrative markets. Today’s market for health-related products alone has been valued at an estimated $15 billion. And as stated by Kozo Takaoka, CEO of Nestlé Japan, "Nestlé must address [health problems associated with food and nutrition] on a global basis and make it our mission for the 21st century." But it is largely more health-conscious consumers that have spurred this trend, pushing food giants like Nestlé to spend billions on acquiring firms ranging from medical research to nutraceuticals. And as household brands start creating treasure troves of genetic and dietary data, personalized nutrition may soon enter the mainstream.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

CRISPR Halts Muscular Dystrophy in Dogs

What it is: Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center used CRISPR to reverse the gene defect causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in dogs. DMD is the most common fatal genetic disease in children, and a decade ago, a group of pups began displaying symptoms of the canine version of DMD. The research team added CRISPR editing instructions to a virus that likes to attack muscle cells and injected four DMD-inflicted dogs with millions of copies of the virus. The canine-patients experienced a 50 percent increase in leg muscle dystrophin levels (dystrophin is the protein absent in DMD), and more than a 90 percent increase in the heart. These results were astounding -- researchers estimate that only a 15 percent increase in dystrophin would bring curative results. While researchers are still studying the long-term effects of the treatment), for now, “they saw no adverse effects. Instead they saw puppies who could play again.”

Why it's important: This is the first time CRISPR has been used on a large mammal. The ability to alter genes in vivo is game-changing in our fight against disease. The funding mechanism for this DMD research is also fascinating: the University of Texas researchers partnered with a startup called Exonics, which licensed the DMD CRISPR treatment technology and are now working on human trials to bring the cure to market. Exonics is backed by "venture philanthropy," in which large nonprofits make venture capital investments to directly drive solutions via market forces and innovation. The nonprofit behind Exonics is the venture arm of CureDuchenne, which has leveraged a total of $1.3 billion in follow-on financing to accelerate DMD research.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Max Goldberg and Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

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Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

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Topics: Abundance Insider Artificial Intellegence Business Models Genetics deepfakes graphene CRISPR
12 min read

Abundance Insider: August 31st, 2018 Edition

By Peter H. Diamandis on Aug 31, 2018

In this week's Abundance Insider: AI-composed "focus" music, Robotics-as-a-Service, and 4D printing for ceramics.

Cheers,
Peter, Marissa, Kelley, Greg, Bri, Jarom, Joseph, Derek, Jason, Claire and Max

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Music Made by AI Composers Improves Concentration

What it is: Brain.fm is one of several companies using artificial intelligence to help us hone into a hyper-productive state of work, a deep state of sleep, or a impeccable state of relaxation. While most music is designed to sound good, Brain.fm works with teams of scientists and engineers generating music that helps listeners achieve their desired state of mind. Human composers write and record the core sound tracks, and an AI engine mixes, matches, and remasters these motifs into longer tracks. Funded by an NSF Grant, this convergence of neuroscience with music theory is shaping up to be a powerful productivity tool.

Why it's important: Artificial intelligence is a user interface allowing us to access the breakthroughs of neuroscience. While direct brain-computer interfaces are a few decades from being consumer-facing, we are seeing a slew of applications that use our existing senses to optimize how our brains function.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

InVia Robotics Creates New Model to Sell Robots to the Masses

What it is: InVia Robotics is selling robotic services versus robots to make warehouses more efficient. The inVia team capitalized on the many mistakes of past robotics manufacturers to build robot hardware and innovate with their business model. InVia engineered movable, puck-shaped robots with a lift that can move the puck’s platform up and down, an arm that can move forward and backward, and a suction pump to drag boxes around a warehouse. InVia demonetizes access to robotics through its Robotics-as-a-Service business model. Instead of purchasing robots, customers can pay by the unit of work robots perform.

Why it's important: InVia’s robotic services are specially designed to address problems in e-commerce warehouse logistics. Older warehouse systems simply can't accommodate the variability (e.g. bundles, colors, sizes, and combinations) of e-commerce shipping and packing needs. By only requiring payment for work performed, Robotics-as-a-Service tears down the initial capital barrier to transitioning to robotics -- a prime example of new business models (as a service) converging with exponential technologies.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Eben Pagan / Written by Max Goldberg 

Research Team Develops the World's First-Ever 4D Printing for Ceramics

What it is: A team of researchers at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has developed the world's first successful method of 4D printing ceramics. With its high melting point, ceramic is a challenge for conventional laser printing, and current 3D-printed precursors rarely achieve complex shapes. But with CityU’s novel "ceramic ink" — a mixture of polymers and ceramic nanoparticles — 3D-printed precursors are remarkably malleable, able to stretch to three times their initial length. And given their elasticity and printable joints, these precursors can then morph and solidify into countless computer-designed shapes under the right heat treatment, boasting strength-to-density ratios far sturdier than other printed ceramics.

Why it's important: Overcoming 2.5 years of materials science challenges, the CityU team's 4D printing convention marks a tremendous breakthrough in self-assembling printed structures and ceramic shapes. With the fourth dimension of time, 4D printing involves objects capable of shape-morphing or self-assembling under certain stimuli, including temperature changes, mechanical force, electrical currents, water, and even light. This has tremendous implications for everything from global communications to space.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Richard Kane / Written by Claire Adair 

VR Helps Amputees Adjust to Their Prostheses

What it is: Researchers at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) are leveraging virtual reality to help amputees more readily adjust to their prosthetic limbs. This virtual reality therapy works by essentially tricking patients into seeing their prosthetics as a part of their physical bodies. The EPFL research team used vision and touch by applying a neurosimulation currents to the nerves in the end of the amputee's stump. The applied current mimics the feel of a tactile stimulation to one finger of the new prosthetic, while the team illuminates -- in virtual reality -- where the prosthetic finger is in real life. By the end of the simulation, the patient’s feeling of where the prosthetic is located matched the actual location of the prosthetic in the patient's mind. Notably, these results lasted for up to 10 minutes after the simulation ended.

Why it's important: Exponential technologies both supplement and supercharge our day-to-day lives. Robots, virtual reality, and artificial intelligence provide extra help and essential healing for us everyday. Now, we are seeing intricate prosthetic limbs rehabilitating individuals’ abilities to carry out nominal day-to-day activities, restoring freedom of movement.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Max Goldberg 

Light-Guided, Genetically Engineered Bacteria Paint Micro Mona Lisa

What it is: Researchers at Italy's Sapienza Università di Roma have genetically engineered E. coli to respond to light, using targeted light stimuli to guide their movement into micro-masterpieces like the Mona Lisa. Geared with living motors and their own propellers, E. coli can swim through liquids at ten times their own length in a second. And by using a recently discovered protein that causes ocean-dwelling bacteria to be powered by light, researchers are now able to direct the E. coli by locally decreasing light intensity. Light-responsive bacteria thereby accumulate into brushstrokes of E. coli, and researchers can shine negative micro-portraits, from Darwin to Einstein.

Why it's important: Engineered E. coli "microbricks" with genetically incorporated traits (such as light sensitivity) could propel numerous real-world innovations. As explained by Sapienza University of Rome's Roberto Di Leonardo, "these fantastic micro-robots could be controlled using physical external stimuli [...] in order to exploit their propulsion for transport, manipulation of microscopic systems inside miniaturized laboratories on a chip.” And given E. coli's infinitesimal scale and our newfound ability to manipulate its movement, this breakthrough could allow for everything from optical 3D printing of sub-millimeter microstructures, to in-vitro biomedical applications, to diagnostics on the single-cell level in labs-on-chips.  Share on Facebook

Spotted by Marissa Brassfield / Written by Claire Adair 

What is Abundance Insider?

This email is a briefing of the week's most compelling, abundance-enabling tech developments, curated by Marissa Brassfield in preparation for Abundance 360. Read more about A360 below.

Want more conversations like this?

At Abundance 360, Peter's 360-person executive mastermind, we teach the metatrends, implications and unfair advantages for entrepreneurs enabled by breakthroughs like those featured above. We're looking for CEOs and entrepreneurs who want to change the world. The program is highly selective. If you'd like to be considered, apply here

Abundance Digital is Peter’s online educational portal and community of abundance-minded entrepreneurs. You’ll find weekly video updates from Peter, a curated newsfeed of exponential news, and a place to share your bold ideas. Click here to learn more and sign up.

Know someone who would benefit from getting Abundance Insider? Send them to this link to sign up.

 

 

Topics: Abundance Insider 3D Printing Robotics Artificial Intellegence Business Models Genetics